Latvia Still Honors the Biggest Jew-Killing Machine in World History

March 18, 2012 11:01 am 11 comments

Monica Lowenberg in front of Freedom Memorial with flag bearers from the National Alliance Party.

On March 16 2012, a 47-year-old British woman, Monica Lowenberg, placed a wreath at the foot of the Freedom Monument in Riga, Latvia. She was dressed in the ghetto garb the Nazis forced Riga’s Jews to wear. Many of her family died at the hands of Germans and their Latvian collaborators.

She stood in silent witness as marchers arrived to celebrate the Latvian Legion of the Waffen-SS, the biggest Jew-killing machine in world history. Latvians pushed Ms Lowenberg to one side to place their own large insignia of the Latvian Waffen-SS in front of the Freedom Monument.

Below is an open letter that Ms Lowenberg wrote to the government and parliament of Latvia to explain why in 2012 she believes, rightly, that no EU member state should be honoring members of the Waffen-SS in an open public ceremony in a European capital city.

Denis MacShane

Open letter to the government and parliament of Latvia on the eve of the Waffen-SS commemoration

My name is Monica Lowenberg and I am the only child and daughter of Ernest Lowenberg, a German Jewish refugee who managed to leave Nazi Germany five days before the outbreak of war in 1939. He was 16. His mother, my grandmother Marianne Loewenberg (née Peiser), born in Leipzig, a violinist and opera singer, managed with the help of the Hinrichsens, owners of the music publishing firm C F Peters, to leave Germany in April 1939 on a domestic’s visa.

Tragically, the rest of the immediate Peiser and Loewenberg family did not manage to escape in time and were brutally murdered in the various camps or shot. My grandfather David Loewenberg or Levenbergs, born in 1877 in Libau in Latvia, was one of eight children, as I discovered only last year in the Latvian Historical State Archives in Riga. His two elder twin brothers also left Latvia, like himself, Moishe for Paris (his children worked in the French Resistance and were murdered by the Gestapo) and Abraham for Tehran. My grandfather was, from what I could gather, the only Levenberg who went to university and studied in Dresden, later making a life for himself in Berlin. He was an engineer and an inventor whose factory was taken away from him by the Nazis in 1935, forcing him to place his two sons in an orphanage.

His other brother and three sisters stayed with their parents, Minna and Lazzers (Lazzers had been a soldier), in Libau and most likely helped them out in their furniture shop. From what I have read, I must conclude that my Levenberg family who stayed in Libau were all murdered by Latvian Arajs commandos and auxiliary police in the Libau massacres of 1941.

After many years of searching for family members and even devoting ten years of my life to studying the Holocaust formally at MA and then DPhil level, working at Sussex university and the Wiener Library as an academic and education officer, I decided to go to Riga for the first time last year and try to establish what had happened to my uncle Paul, my father’s brother born in Halle, Germany, 20 January 1922.

Paul, who was a year older than my father, had not managed to get out of Nazi Germany and therefore found himself trying to leave for Palestine with the help of a Jewish youth movement. He worked first of all on a farm in Denmark before going to Riga to work in 1940. The last letter my grandmother received from him was dated 8 September 1940. In the Riga archives, I discovered that Paul had been sent to the Riga ghetto on 4 October 1941. There are no records of what happened to him. I must assume that he was killed, aged 19. In 1941 and 1942, 90 per cent of Latvia’s pre-war 62,000 Jews were killed, Latvian commandos and auxiliary police taking a leading role in their extermination.

As I am sure you can appreciate, discovering these facts has been exceptionally distressing. However, it was equally distressing to discover that the men actively involved in the mass murders of Latvia’s Jews joined the 15th and 19th Divisions of the Latvian SS in 1943. The 15th Division was the most decorated out of all Himmler’s SS divisions. In an EU country, these men are today held as “heroes” by many Latvians.

The current Latvian prime minister feels we should “bow” our heads to these Waffen-SS killers. I also find it of deep concern that British Conservative MEPs in the European Parliament work with the Latvian MEP Roberts Zile and have made an unholy alliance with the party to which he is connected.

Last year two Latvian politicians, Dzintars Rasnacs and Raivis Dzintars, participated in the march to honour the Waffen-SS, the greatest Jew-killing machine in world history. Raivis Dzintars belongs to the national association “All For Latvia!” and was a member of the ultranationalist For Fatherland and Freedom/LNNK party, to which Mr Zile is still linked.

I must also add that another party comrade of Mr Zile told the Latvian parliament that LNNK has always been against the trial of Konrads Kalejs and other Latvians accused of Nazi crimes. Kalejs was a close assistant of Viktors Arajs, chief of the bloody Arajs Commando, responsible for guarding and finishing off those Jews who were still alive in the ditches into they fell after mass shootings. Some survived and tried to escape but the Latvians were on hand to kill them.

To raise concern about these Latvian politicians and the Waffen-SS, I launched a petition, started on the anniversary of my uncle’s birthday – 20 January 2012 – 70 years to the day of the Wannsee conference when the Final Solution of exterminating the Jews was planned. The petition was called “Stop the 16 March Marches in Riga and Latvians Revising History”, as I sincerely believe glorification of pro-Nazi armed forces during the Second World War has no place in a country that is a member of the European Union, Nato, the OSCE and the Council of Europe.

In little over a month, the petition has gained over 5,500 votes from around the world, indicating that I am not alone in believing that such glorification is terribly wrong. One should add that the ECRI, the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance, had already in 2008 explicitly stated: “All attempts to commemorate persons who fought in the Waffen-SS and collaborate with the Nazis should be condemned. Any gathering or march legitimizing in any way Nazism should be banned.” The ECRI reiterated the same in its most recent report about Latvia, dated 21 February 2012.

The Latvian apologists and their friends in British politics who refuse to dissociate themselves from Mr Zile should consider the following:

1. Many of the worst Latvian killers served in the Latvian Security Police prior to joining the SS Legion. Honoring such persons would be a travesty of justice and a whitewash of their heinous crimes.

2. The Legion fought under the Nazi high command for victory of the Third Reich. They do not deserve to be honored for fighting for a victory of the most genocidal regime in human history. Ironically, such a victory would have been a disaster for Latvia because the Nazis had no intention or plan to grant Latvia independence.

3. About one-third of those who served in the Legion were volunteers (two-thirds were drafted) and many of them had served in Latvian Security Police units that actively participated in the mass murder of Jews in Latvia and in Belarus, such as the infamous Arajs Commando squad.

4. When Latvian SS killed Soviet soldiers, they allowed Nazis on the western front to kill British and American soldiers in turn and thus made it possible for Auschwitz and other concentration camps to continue their heinous crimes against humanity.

5. Democratic Latvia should not glorify those willing to give up their lives for victory of the Third Reich. The Latvian Righteous Gentiles would make much better role models.

6. The ultranationalists who support the march are the ones who are seeking to rewrite the accepted narrative of the Holocaust in Latvia. Their efforts will help hide the crimes of local Nazi collaborators and promote the canard of equivalency between communist and Nazi crimes.

7. Ceremonies in churches and cemeteries are also forms of honoring the deceased (whether they deserve it or not). Witness the masses held in Zagreb and Split, Croatia, last December in honor of the Croatian mass murderer and leader of the Ustashe Ante Pavelic.

As these men march from the main Latvian Lutheran Church towards the symbol of Latvian independence – Freedom Monument in Riga’s central square on 16 March – will any of these men and politicians spare a thought for their Latvian murdered compatriots who happened to be Jewish? Will they remember how 25,000 of them, in the autumn of 1941, over two weekends, were marched down Riga’s streets from the ghetto to Rumbula, shot and thrown into pits using the “sardine method”? Will they say a prayer for them?

With kind regards,

Monica Lowenberg

Denis MacShane is MP for Rotherham and a former Europe Minister

11 Comments

  • I am surprised this woman has her D.Phil, for her letter was so poorly written as to be incomprehensible in some places. It was as if she wrote it whilst inebriated. How sad that higher education allows such atrocious sentence structure and lack of clarity.

    Not to mention the pathetic attempt to vilify the Latvian people who were merely commemorating their dead, not glorifying the Waffen-SS.

  • There is no evidence that 6 million Jews were killed under Stalin. This is just ridiculous anti-communist rubbish. Jews, far too many, did die but not because they were Jews but because Stalin murdered many people he saw as opponents.

    In fact at least 1.5 million Jews escaped extermination in the wake of Operation Barbarossa because the USSR moved them further inland. But for Stalin’s stupidity and counter revolutionary politics, which mean that partisan groups were not set up before the invasion in Belorrussia with secret arms dumps, not doubt many more would have survived.

    But to swallow this anti-communist bilge is to play Robert Zile’s game.

  • were there more than one family “Loewenberg” or “Löwenberg” in Libau ah 1890?

  • James Staley

    When Latvians honor the Latvian Legion they are not honoring Nazism or racism. They are mourning their war dead and honoring those boys who fought against re-occupation of their country by the Soviets. There is no sign of Nazi nostalgia or glorification of the SS in these ceremonies or in today’s Latvian society. This kind of article is very bad for Jews because it promotes the idea that the Holocaust mentality is just lying beneath the surface, ready to leap forth again. Mr Denis McShane clearly has not done his homework. He should be ashamed to write such nonsense. I see in Wikipedia that he has a long record of misrepresentations of various sorts. This is very bad mischief in this case. I am an American, living in Latvia and would never wish to be here if it were the sort of place that would celebrate the SS or the Holocaust. This article is shameful slander.

  • Facts from Wikipedia:

    - “only 15-20% of the soldiers serving in the legion were actual volunteers.”

    - “The Latvian Legion was not directly involved in the Holocaust, since it was conscripted more than a year after Latvian Jews were executed or sent to concentration camps.”

    - “Soldiers serving in the Legion did not share Nazi ideology and upon conscription were not required to swear loyalty to Germany or Hitler.”

    - “Legionnaires hoped to fight off the Soviet Union … then turn its arms against Nazi Germany”- “Latvians … believed that Western powers … would come to their aid as they had in 1918-1920. They were unaware that Churchill and FDR had consigned the Baltics to Stalin.”

    - “during the Soviet period it was generally acknowledged that Latvian Legion soldiers were neither Nazis nor war criminals, which sharply contrasts with the current stance of Russia”

  • Well, then I as an inhabitant of Latvia which formerly was a part of USSR, would really request you to stop celebrating the end of WW2 as for Latvia and some other countries this meant the beginning of horrible 50 years. Many people were sent to Siberia, many died there, many were killed there. Why doesn’t anyone listen to that? I really understand that many Jews were killed by SS people and that really is horrible, but for these few old men this event actually means celebration for fighting for the freedom of Latvia (and, yes, they happened to be on the wrong side for doing that, because there was no “Latvian national side” as the country was all the time occupied by one or the other fighting side – commiting horrible crimes against Latvians. BUT DO YOU CARE TO WRITE ABOUT THAT???). And besides – the victory of WW2 for Stalin meant that he could kill millions of Ukrainians (starve them to death by selling their crops to West – yes, to you, my dears), but still the end of WW2 is a celebration. What the hell?

    • Hm… well, for us Jews living in Russia and satellite countries, the end of WWII signaled the end of one era of genocide, and the beginning of another. Stalin killed another 6 million Jews.. However, the end of the war was cause for celebration b/c Siberia wasn’t as bad as Auschwitz, and 6 million killed in 12 years isn’t as bad as 6.

      • Oh my – you are counting killed humans mathematically. What’s wrong with you? One killed child is better that two? IT IS STILL HORRIBLE.

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