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American Hebrew Literature, by Michael Weingrad (REVIEW)

October 29, 2012 5:50 pm 1 comment

American Hebrew Literature.

American Hebrew Literature, by Michael Weingrad (Syracuse University Press, 2011).

Lost causes, forsaken beliefs, impossible loyalties! How many of these figure in, and sometimes disfigure, Jewish history. False messiahs like Sabbatai Zevi and Jacob Frank.  Jewish homelands in Uganda or Birobidjan or pre-state Alaska. Yiddish as the official language of the State of Israel.  Judaism “reconstructed” as ethical culture or liberalism.  Jewish national renewal in medieval Spain or late nineteenth-century Poland or—and this is the subject of Michael Weingrad’s fascinating book–twentieth-century America.

With the foundation of the State of Israel and the adoption of Hebrew as its official language, the rivalrous relationship between Hebrew (the holy tongue) and Yiddish (the mameloshn or vernacular) assumed a new aspect.  Hebrew, precisely because it had been preserved for centuries in the warm storage of Yiddish, had been reborn while  other attempts at linguistic revival (in Ireland and Wales)  had largely failed. But its success exacted a price. The destruction of European Jewry had transformed  Yiddish, the language of millions of recently silenced mouths, into the language of martyrdom, with its own claim to being the holy tongue; and  Hebrew had become a language of everyday use in the Jewish state, including the mouths of peddlers of unkosher meat in Tel-Aviv.

In 1954, the  literary critic Irving Howe and the poet Eliezer Greenberg  published A Treasury of Yiddish Stories, an anthology of “a literature virtually unknown to Americans”  which they dedicated “To the Six Million.” In a heroic attempt to rescue a literature, merely 150 years old, that had been cut short by mass murder, they translated many stories themselves and enlisted the help of numerous translators, among them  Saul Bellow, Isaac Rosenfeld, Julius and Frances Butwin. They also provided a stunning introduction, which claimed the great themes of Yiddish literature to be “the virtue of powerlessness, the power of helplessness, the company of the dispossessed, the sanctity of the insulted and the injured.” They took account of the partnership between Hebrew and Yiddish, adding that “Yiddish literature releases a profound yearning for a return not to the supremacy of Hebrew but to those conditions of life that would make possible the supremacy of Hebrew—that is, a yearning for the end of the dispersion and a reintegration of Jewish life.”

That yearning is also the subject of  Michael Weingrad’s magisterial attempt at another heroic rescue, of an even more short-lived Jewish literature, the American Hebrew writing of maskilim (Enlightened Jews) who arrived in America as a tiny minority  within the  Jewish migrations of  1880-1920. Their linguistic and cultural allegiance was to the Hebrew language. Their brief flowering began in about 1915, and by the 1960s most had died or (a crucial  fact) moved to Israel. Weingrad calls his book a counterhistory of American Jewish Culture, a “road not taken” by the majority.  The spate of egregious recent books by stridently “non-Zionist” Jewish Studies professors invoking that title of  Robert Frost’s famous poem,  may well set off alarm bells; but they should not. Weingrad (who runs the Jewish Studies Program at Portland State University)  is not  averting his gaze from the worldwide campaign to expel Israel from the family of nations by excavating from obscurity Jewish writers who opposed Zionism . Quite the contrary:  Weingrad explicitly warns against “post-Zionists” imposing their ideological prejudices and “Diasporism” onto these writers (one of whom, Naftali Imber, composed Hatikvah).

This is a body of writing even less well-known to Americans than the Yiddish writers were when Howe’s Treasury appeared in 1954;  and Weingrad’s rescue operation is  more arduous than Howe’s  because he has done  the massive work of translation mainly by himself.  His book is a major contribution to Hebrew Studies,  to American Studies,  and to understanding the unresolved dilemma of American Jews, as poignantly expressed in the novel Ad mashber (Point of Crisis) by the preeminent American Hebrew writer, Shimon Halkin: “This is America! If it weren’t   for Jews and Judaism, you couldn’t find a nicer place in the world.”

The range of Weingrad’s books (and intellect) is evident from his chapter titles and subtitles: “America Is My Cage” (in a zoo for “defeated languages”);  “The Indian in  American Hebrew Literature”; “I Am Not in New York” (Hebrew writers in small-town Christian America); “Messiah, American Style” (an apparently  anachronistic but actually brilliant digression to Mordecai Noah, who tried (and failed) to establish a Jewish “City of Refuge”  for oppressed and persecuted Jews (and  dispossessed American Indians ) near Buffalo;  “The Last Mohicans” (the label applied by poet Gabriel Preil  to himself and other remnants of a disappearing American-Hebrew culture. With the death of I. B. Singer in 1991 the whole prose literature of Yiddish had come to an end;  the death of Preil in 1993 did  nearly the same for American Hebrew poetry.

Secular Hebrew writers were more quixotically idealistic than their Yiddishist counterparts because they tried to create an American center of Hebrew culture at a time when (as Alan Mintz observes in his excellent foreword ) “there was virtually no such thing…as a native speaker of Hebrew.” Nevertheless, they had grasped  an important truth: Hebrew, a kind of “portable homeland,”  could connect American Jews both to their past and to Jews around the world.  The Hebraists’ struggle against the “Americanization” of Jewry in general and Jewish illiteracy in particular was not without notable successes. Numerous teachers’ colleges  that trained Jewish educators were staffed by immigrant Hebraists; many prominent Jewish intellectuals were schooled in Hebraist  summer camps.   Thanks to their efforts,  many of us now in our dotage studied Hebrew in public high schools. (At  the height of their enthusiasm, the Hebraists, firmly opposed to  “the melting pot” -i.e., the road usually taken– attempted  to get  public school systems to require Hebrew language study for Jewish students.) Some of the most talented writers, like Avraham Regelson and Shimon Halkin, deserve special posthumous honors as the most bountiful of literary uncles. Cynthia Ozick  has said that her uncle Regelson was for her “a kind of spiritual model” who made it seem “quite natural to belong to the secular world of literature”; and Hillel Halkin has said that the Zionism of his Uncle Simon “had always been a model for me.”

Yet  the failure of the Hebraists commands more attention than their successes. The aforementioned Noah, when his proto-Zionist project (called Ararat) for a temporary Jewish refuge in America had come to naught, admitted that “every attempt to colonize the Jews in other countries [than Palestine] has failed.”  His twentieth-century successors thought that addition of a stringent Hebrew-language requirement might create a Jewish way-station in America; it did not. Ironically, the  greatest literary successes were poems and novels bemoaning  the failure to create a significant Hebrew cultural life outside of Israel. “My Zionism,” wrote Simon Halkin, “was crueler than theirs” (the other American Hebraists) because he recognized before they did that Jews could not “exist as a historical people except in one place, in the Land of Israel.” In 1949 he emigrated to Israel , as did many movement leaders. Their valiant efforts were not sufficient to disprove the axiom that, as his nephew Hillel has relentlessly insisted,  Eretz Yisrael is the only land and Hebrew the only language to which the whole of Jewish history and the Jewish people resonate and respond.

Edward Alexander’s latest book is The State of the Jews: A Critical Appraisal (Transaction Publishers, 2012).

1 Comment

  • MY RESEARCH SHOWS THAT THE JEWS FROM SPAIN WERE THE FIRST TO HIT THE SHORES OF USA.

    ALSO what I hear is that yiddish was used to disquise the hebrew language in hiding from the oppressors.

    We all know that Moses and all the prophets including our fathers Abraham,Itzhaq and Yaacob spoke hebrew.

    WHY THIS COMPULSIVE NEED TO RESURRECT SOMETHING THAT SEPARATES ISRAEL?

    WHY USE A LANGUAGE WHERE ITS ROOTS ARE WITH THE HOLOCAUST?

    WHY DO THOSE JEWS CONSISTENTLY AND BLINDLY SUPPORT DEMOCRATES IN USA.

    WHY DO ISRAELIS GIVE AWAY LAND WHEN THE RECENT HISTORY *PROVES* THAT IT ONLY PROMOTES MORE TERRORISM.

    WHY DO JEWS PAY HOMAGE TO A ROMAN POPE OR AN AMERICAN PRESIDENT AND NOT ***THE ONE G’D OF EVERYTHING?***

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