Ceasing Fire: Response to Warfare from Gaza, Part I

November 21, 2012 2:24 pm 1 comment

A Hamas video showcasing the terrorist group's core mission of killing Israelis. Photo: Palestinian Media Watch.

It is an odd thing, this ceasing of fire being negotiated between Israel and Hamas.  A throwback to wars of old, it postulates that in the absence of shooting, the parties will retrieve their dead, celebrate their festivals (see the 1914 Christmas truce on the battlefield of Flanders), or even, possibly, figure out what to do in the longer term.  It is entirely in-applicable to Israel — first and foremost because the shooting is not the greatest problem Israel faces.

Israel’s problem is more of certainty and uncertainty.

The concentration of Israeli brainpower and American funds on the problem of Gaza yielded Iron Dome — a homegrown Israeli system that not only tracks and hits incoming rockets and missiles, but differentiates spatially between those that will hit populated areas and those that will fall outside the boundaries of major population centers.  So when you read that Iron Dome has hit X percent of the rockets overall, it has hit a much greater proportion of rockets that would have caused substantial damage and death.  Couple that with the excellent civil defense system in Israel and the readiness of the population to do what the government tells it to do in an emergency, and you have a disconnect between the volume of criminal fire emanating from Gaza (all of the fire emanating from Gaza is criminal, because many of the rockets don’t have guidance to be shot at specific targets, and the ones that might aren’t fired at military targets) and Israeli casualty figures.

Is that why CNN and Fox show only Palestinian children running, wailing, and screaming — because their leadership put the launchers among them and didn’t spend a nickel on safe rooms, civil defense, shelters, or anti-missile systems?  (Hint: no.)

In addition, Israel could, if it chose, simply flatten Gaza.  For all the international mock outrage about Israeli tactics, does anyone think that after a thousand Air Force sorties, if Israel intended Palestinian genocide, it couldn’t have been committed by now?  You can watch the YouTube videos of Israeli Air Force pilots aborting missions because they see people in the streets and “knocking on the roof” to encourage people to leave buildings. International media outlets are screaming that Israel fired into a building that housed their offices, but Palestinian Islamic Jihad acknowledged that a senior commander had his headquarters there and that Israel had killed him there.  The journalists are lucky that Hamas’s enemy is Israel.

If Israel’s problem is neither the number of Israeli casualties nor any inability to crater Gaza, we return to certainty and uncertainty.  There is certainty that Hamas desires the destruction of the Jewish state through warfare (the fact that it can’t do it is irrelevant).  This leads to psychologically debilitating uncertainty about the timing of the next round of warfare.  A negotiated ceasefire at any point leaves both of those intact.

There is certainty, too, that Hamas — and its patron Iran — cheat.  Is there anyone out there still who believes that Iran’s nuclear aspirations are peaceful and that they’ve shown the IAEA everything?  Under the circumstances, any Hamas promise to do anything — should it make one — would be nothing but cause for additional uncertainty as to the time of its breaking.

So, what is Israel to do?

Cease fire.

Cease fire unilaterally at the moment Israel decides that it has done as much destruction of Hamas capabilities inside Gaza as its military command deems essential.  And cease fire with a message — that the ceasing of fire is indeed unilateral and is undertaken because the government of Israel has decided that it has done what it intended to do and therefore chooses to stop without regard to what Hamas wants.  And that because it was unilaterally begun, it will last only as long as the government of Israel finds that it serves the interest of the State.  If it doesn’t, fire will recommence, and that without regard to Hamas as well.

That puts the problem of certainty and uncertainty on the other side.

This article by Shoshana Bryen was originally published by the American Thinker.

1 Comment

  • Lawrence Kulak

    It was interesting to see cnn’s two gay anchors, Anderson Cooper and Don Lemon teaming up during the bombing of Gaza to make it look like Israel was randomly causing carnage. Lemon kept on showing the same bomb blast over and over again with Cooper standing in the foreground and having to duck as if this somehow was outrageous. What was outrageous were the desperate attempts of these two gay men – particularly Lemon to try to brandish Israel as the aggressors. At one point, while interviewing one of Hamas’ mediators, Don Lemon asked him if the answer to the Gaza bombing was “Arab Unity.” This was a clear attempt to suggest that the Arabs should all unite to destroy Israel. It is a good thing that CNN has other fair anchors like Piers Morgan and Erin Burnett to offset the likes of Don Lemon. Erin Burnett who is a beautiful woman both inside and out is probably laughing to herself at the effeminate Lemon who would be about as useful to a woman like that as a corkscrew in opening a can of tuna fish.

Leave a Reply

Please note: comments may be published in the Algemeiner print edition.


Current day month ye@r *

More...

  • Sports Israeli Soccer Team Faces Prospect of International Ban

    Israeli Soccer Team Faces Prospect of International Ban

    The Israel National soccer team could be facing a World Cup ban, and other soccer sanctions, unless it alleviates travel restrictions and increases field access for Palestinian players and coaches. The head of the Palestinian Football Association is pushing for international soccer’s governing body, the Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA), to issue a ban on Israel competing internationally, claiming Israel’s restrictive travel for Palestinians is equivalent to a form of oppression. “It’s not only the athletes,” Jibril Rajoub explains. [...]

    Read more →
  • Beliefs and concepts Book Reviews Jewish Author of ‘Eat to Live’ Dishes on Health Care, Nutrition, Disease Prevention

    Jewish Author of ‘Eat to Live’ Dishes on Health Care, Nutrition, Disease Prevention

    JNS.org – While the national debate on “Obamacare” rages on past the recent March 31 sign-up deadline, bestselling Jewish author Dr. Joel Fuhrman says the “current disease care model of what we call ‘health care’ cannot possibly be sustained.” “There is simply not enough money available to support a system in which the lion’s share of expenditures is devoted to acute care, with virtually nothing being spent on preventive medicine, i.e. health care,” Fuhrman says in an interview. “To make [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Jewish Identity ‘Tears of Color’ Art Exhibit Shows Struggles of Israelis With Eating Disorders

    ‘Tears of Color’ Art Exhibit Shows Struggles of Israelis With Eating Disorders

    JNS.org – “This is how I want to be—without fear. Independent. I want to be like a bird. I want to spread my wings.” So reads part of the description beneath one of the 30 paintings on display until the end of May at the ZOA House in Tel Aviv. The collection represents the first-ever art exhibit of its kind: an exhibit created entirely by Israelis in treatment for eating disorders. Dubbed “Tears of Color,” based on one of the [...]

    Read more →
  • Beliefs and concepts Book Reviews Overprotective or Loving? Daughters Reflect on Jewish Mothers in New Anthology

    Overprotective or Loving? Daughters Reflect on Jewish Mothers in New Anthology

    JNS.org – Rachel Ament noticed that she and her friends often shared humorous anecdotes that were typically variations on a theme: overprotective, worrying Jewish moms who smothered them with love. That included Ament’s own mother. “My mom is probably every Jewish stereotype scrunched into one,” the Washington, DC, resident tells JNS.org. “At the root of all these stereotypical, worrying, overprotective moms, is love.” A social media writer for Capital One, as well as a freelance writer, Ament decided about three years [...]

    Read more →
  • Book Reviews Commentary ‎Kosher Lust: Love is Not the Answer (REVIEW)

    ‎Kosher Lust: Love is Not the Answer (REVIEW)

    Kosher Lust, by Shmuley Boteach (Gefen Publishing House, 2014). You really do want to find something positive to say about Shmuley Boteach. He is a phenomenon; very bright, an articulate bundle of energy and self-promotion. Anyone who has the chutzpah to describe himself as “America’s Rabbi” deserves ten out of ten for effort. I believe that along with most Chabad alumni, official and unofficial, he does a lot of good and is a sort of national treasure. In this world [...]

    Read more →
  • Jewish Identity Theater Hollywood’s Revisiting of Passover’s Exodus Story a Part of Throwback ‘Year of the Bible’

    Hollywood’s Revisiting of Passover’s Exodus Story a Part of Throwback ‘Year of the Bible’

    JNS.org – In a throwback to the golden age of cinema, Hollywood has declared 2014 the “Year of the Bible.” From Ridley Scott’s Exodus starring Christian Bale as Moses, to Russell Crowe playing Noah, Hollywood is gambling on new innovations in technology and star power to revisit some of the most popular stories ever told. “It’s definitely a throwback to the 1950s and early ’60s,” Dr. Stephen J. Whitfield, an American Studies professor at Brandeis University, told JNS.org. Starting with The [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture US & Canada ‘Jewish Giant’ Headlines New York Jewish Museum Exhibit

    ‘Jewish Giant’ Headlines New York Jewish Museum Exhibit

    Eddie Carmel, dubbed “The Jewish Giant” by American photographer Diane Arbus, is the centerpiece of a new exhibit opening April 11 at The Jewish Museum in New York. Arbus met Carmel, who was billed “The World’s Tallest Man,” at Hubert’s Dime Museum and Flea Circus in 1959 but waited until 1970 to photograph him at his parents’ home in the Bronx, according to the museum. The son of immigrants from Tel Aviv, Carmel posed for Arbus with his head bowed to [...]

    Read more →
  • Music US & Canada Disney Hit ‘Frozen’ Gets Passover Themed Makeover With ‘Chozen’ (VIDEO)

    Disney Hit ‘Frozen’ Gets Passover Themed Makeover With ‘Chozen’ (VIDEO)

    A Passover themed cover of hit songs Let It Go and Do You Want to Build a Snowman? from Disney’s Frozen has attracted tons of media buzz and a cool 65,ooo views on YouTube within days of going online. The work of Jewish a capella group Six13, the track is aptly named Chozen. We are celebrating “our freedom, our favorite festival, our fabulous fans, and aspiring Disney princesses everywhere” the group said. The Chozen music video tells the story of [...]

    Read more →



Sign up now to receive our regular news briefs.