Saturday, December 3rd | 3 Kislev 5777

Close

Be in the know!

Get our exclusive daily news briefing.

Subscribe
December 26, 2012 11:51 am

Archeologists Make Rare Discovery West of Jerusalem

avatar by Zach Pontz

Email a copy of "Archeologists Make Rare Discovery West of Jerusalem" to a friend

Aerial view of excavation site. Photo: Israel Antiques Authority

Archeologists made a rare discovery at Tel Motza, to the west of Jerusalem, recently: evidence of the Jewish religious practices and rituals in the early days of the Kingdom of Judah. Among the finds are a ritual building and a cache of sacred vessels some 2,750 years old.

Anna Eirikh, Dr. Hamoudi Khalaily and Shua Kisilevitz, the directors of the excavation, released a joint statement provided by the Israeli Antiquities Authority in which they said: “The ritual building at Tel Motza is an unusual and striking find, in light of the fact that there are hardly any remains of ritual buildings of the period in Judaea at the time of the First Temple. The uniqueness of the structure is even more remarkable because of the vicinity of the site’s proximity to the capital city of Jerusalem, which acted as the Kingdom’s main sacred center at the time.”

Their statement continued: “The finds recently discovered at Tel Motza provide rare archaeological evidence for
the existence of temples and ritual enclosures in the Kingdom of Judah in general, and in the Jerusalem region in particular, prior to the religious reforms throughout the kingdom at the end of the monarchic period (at the time of Hezekiah and Isaiah), which abolished all ritual sites, concentrating ritual practices solely at the Temple in Jerusalem.”

Tel Motza and the surrounding region is known for its archaeological treasures. Many finds have previously been uncovered at the site, from a variety of different periods. The Israel Antiquities Authority is currently conducting excavations at the Tel Motza archaeological site, prior to work being carried out on the new Highway 1 from Sha’ar HaGai to Jerusalem by the National Roads Company.

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner
  • Those figurine heads with the flat top hats struck me as looking like they could be ritual heads of Philistines, which raises the questions of purpose. Were they deposited by Philistines themselves or were these a form of magic directed against the Philistines, or whomever or whatever these images were meant to symbolize..

    Very cool find. Look forward to more news.

  • Findings like this corroborate some of the observations that I have made in my writings, particularly in my latest book-“The Igbos And Israel-An Inter-cultural Study Of The Oldest And Largest Jewish Diaspora”.
    http://www.amazon.com/The-Igbos-Israel-Inter-cultural-ebook/dp/B008N2VHBI

    From my research I have found that there were even synagogues, existing side by side with the Temple in ancient Israel, and that worship related to sacrifices were by no means carried out only in the Temple until a much later period.

Algemeiner.com