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Lessons from Brooklyn College BDS, Barghouti, and Butler

February 22, 2013 10:32 am 6 comments

Reader and correspondent David Lurie has directed me to some not well-publicized revelations about the Brooklyn College BDS event. To begin, the campus BDS chapter defended itself against various accusations of selective and prejudicial admission to the event and other claims, including the discriminatory eviction of four Jewish students. On the face of it, the account of circumstances surrounding admission is conceivable. One can easily imagine the organizers having become overwhelmed by the notoriety and numbers drawn by the event. One can imagine, but since there is no video record of events, we have only the current claims and counter claims.

Why is there no video record of events, which would help clarify the circumstances of the eviction of the four students, confirming or disconfirming different accounts?

Initially, BC-SJP decided not to allow the event to be videotaped by media, at the request of one of the speakers whose remarks were to be published online in The Nation magazine the same day.

While Brooklyn BDS curiously declines to name the speaker who requested the videotape ban, we know that this was Judith Butler, since they were her remarks that were published in The Nation. This is the Butler who opened her remarks by praising the idea of academic freedom and its preservation (!) in the successful holding of the BDS event.

It is not difficult to see why Butler sought the ban on videotaping. It was just last summer, during the controversy over her award of the Adorno Prize, when videotape of a 2006 UC Berkeley event revealed her praise of Hamas and Hezbollah as progressive organizations and her advocacy of engagement with them. During the summer controversy, she sought to misrepresent by the written word only what she had actually said, but the videotape exposed the truth. This time, Butler ensured there would be only her official statement. Without a videotape of her delivered remarks, we cannot even know for sure that what The Nation printed is even a completely accurate account of what Butler actually said.

Next, in a telephone interview with The Jewish Week, Carlos Guzman, one of the BDS event organizers, provided an account of the student evictions that contradicts public statements even by Brooklyn College.

The organizer of this month’s controversial forum at Brooklyn College who ordered four pro-Israel students ousted from the event said he acted because the students “didn’t belong” in the room, despite having been escorted there by a vice president of the school.

In an interview with The Jewish Week, Carlos Guzman said he also acted because it seemed to him that the students “were preparing” to circulate flyers to others in the room — not because they were doing so, as a college spokesman previously alleged.

….

Guzman later told The Jewish Week that college administrators “broke the rules. … They basically snuck them in without our knowledge, into the room.”

Amid the declarations of commitment to academic freedom and free inquiry, we see a contradictory pattern. Butler closed her remarks with a moral imperative.

We can or, rather, must start with how we speak, and how we listen, with the right to education, and to dwell critically, fractiously, and freely in political discourse together.

This is a characteristic, though unusually lucid example of the mystico-poetic theory-talk that emerged from the influence of Martin Heidegger. The notion of “dwelling” is particularly Heideggerian. Heidegger, in his profound considerations of the nature and function of language, distinguished between the practical use of language, in order to do things, and language that seeks deeper meaning, which gives rise to the poetic. Heidegger, we came to learn, failed drastically himself at managing the intersection of these two roles. Many of his linguistic children actually use a version of the poetic – specialized language like “dwell” – united with more generally impenetrable prose to obscure what they advocate doing (what they might call praxis) in the high fashion garb of intellectual mere rumination: I come to consider, not to act. Or in the reverse rhetorical ploy, seeking the same obscurity of action behind the act of speech, “I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.”

Butler could more simply have said, in order to promote model democratic behavior, “We need to listen and speak freely and openly with each other, even when we disagree.” Instead, promoting a kind of realm of transformed being, she declares we must “dwell critically, fractiously, and freely in political discourse together.” In such a formulation strong disagreement is not merely a democratic difficulty we need to accommodate; it is fractiousness itself that is as much a feature as a bug of this elevated state of dwelling in free inquiry.

That’s the talk. What’s the praxis?

Butler bans cameras and publishes an official statement, which may or may not represent what she actually said, in a house organ – just as would any common pol who has placed into the Congressional “Record” remarks he later amends, or never actually delivered on a congressional floor. Or some Commissar erecting a verbal Potemkin Village of an occurrence. She does not, by any account, speak up to protest when the Brooklyn BDS modus operandi, according to one of the event’s own organizers was clearly not to “dwell critically, fractiously, and freely in political discourse together.”

It is a phenomenon always to be observed how a certain kind of missionary critic will become, by backward projection, that which she, or he, critiques. Witness Julian Assange’s efforts to protect his own secrets.

A truth about BDS that it seeks to obscure, and about many fervid opponents of Israel, is that much like the verbal show of intellectual liberty belied by performance above, they mask their fuller intentions under a cloak of civil rights or, here, academic freedom. In the West today, there are many Islamic fundamentalists who will decry any apparent violation of their rights – which in a democracy they should indeed be entitled to do – while, as advocates of Sharia, they do actually believe in those rights at all. During the McCarthy era, those who appeared resistantly before congressional committees commonly stood on either their Fifth or First Amendment rights. They did have rights to do either, but which choice they made – to refuse to disclose their beliefs in self-protection or to assert freely their right to those beliefs – could reveal much about the integrity of the person’s acts and position.

Fundamental to Brooklyn College and its political science department’s defense in sponsoring the BDS event was the claim that sponsorship did not signal endorsement of BDS as a policy. I have already discussed the greater complexity of implication in the sponsorship than such simple disclaimers acknowledge. It appears that every other academic department on the Brooklyn College campus recognized this complexity, too, when all 33 that political science chair Paisley Currah contacted amid the controversy, that they might ratify the political science department in co-sponsorship, declined to do so. Brooklyn College English professor and well-known progressive voice Eric Alterman explained this refusal.

No doubt many if not most of the supporters of BDS are the naïve, idealistic types of people who were attracted to Communism in the thirties, the Black Panthers in the sixtiess, the Nader campaign in 2000 and who knows what will comes next. In certain respects, once upon a time, I was this kind of person myself. But their innocence—and the abuse that results from opposing them—does not excuse our responsibility to condemn the intellectual masquerade in which BDS engages and the destructive consequences it supports.

BDS leader Omar Barghouti has openly, yet disingenuously stated,

While I firmly advocate nonviolent forms of struggle such as boycott, divestment, and sanctions to attain Palestinian goals, I just as decisively, though on a separate track, support a unitary state based on freedom, justice, and comprehensive equality as the solution to the Palestinian-Israeli colonial conflict.

This is an intellectually preposterous notion, tapping into both the deceitful and self-deceptive etymology of the fallacious. BDS promotes the most aggressively delegitimizing view of Israel’s position, policies, and practices in response to over sixty years of rejection and aggression against it from the Arab world. To advocate for the moral imperative of BDS is to reject Israel’s claims to its history, both ancient and modern, and the legitimacy of its efforts to survive as a Jewish state. Barghouti, in fact, advocates the demise of Israel as a Jewish state. These are not different tracks: the perspective on Israel and the effective goal are the same. The claim of a “separate track” is a declarative shell game so poor and detectable that one can see the ball rolling on the table as it shifts from shell to shell.

More openly, Judith Butler, without the aid of rhetorical railroad switches, openly opposes the existence of Israel.

Despite its claims, what the Brooklyn College political science department sponsored was more than an educational exercise in academic freedom, a demonstration of the free inquiry that is the defining activity of a university. If what the department did was no more than place its imprimatur on the BDS event as one presenting an idea worthy of intellectual consideration and debate, then what the department so offered moral standing to is the idea that Israel, in its historic self-defense, is an outlaw state, an idea promoted by two people who believe that Israel should cease to exist and who are committed to promoting that end. The wild and ludicrous arrogance of all those involved in fulfilling this role lies in the smug sense of entitlement to so threaten the legitimacy and future of a whole nation, the fulfillment of a people’s millennial dream of deliverance, and receive no strong and assertive reaction in response. The burlesque of this academic variety review is to pretend that BDS is mere formulas on a chalkboard, the oscillating multi-verse versus a terminal Big Bang, a symposium on Adam Smith and Karl Marx – when instead it is an activist political campaign against one party to an intractable and existential conflict. And supporters of that party, Israel, are supposed to light their pipes and polish their elbow patches and admire the scholarship.

One truth may be that some academics are so accustomed to the flatulent stink of their own quickly dissipating rhetoric – like Butler’s commitment to dwelling in something or other – that they believe they can engage in political activism in the guise of academic inquiry and receive a free pass from those they act against. They think they get to play pied piper, then claim that all they are doing is putting on a concert. A marked case in point is CUNY doctoral student Kristofer Petersen-Overton, the focus of controversy at Brooklyn College himself two years ago, when he was hired, then unhired, then rehired to teach a grad course on the Middle East.

Writing in the Huffington Post to criticize those who opposed the Brooklyn College BDS event, Petersen-Overton offered the standard disingenuous deceptions, claiming of opponents that they had

managed to transform a standard panel discussion on a controversial issue into a cause for pious outrage.

A standard panel discussion of two, not discussants, but advocates. But why quibble over nomenclature. It’s just talk, right?

Petersen-Overton also took issue with Alan Dershowitz, whom he termed a

longtime scourge and chief prosecutor of insufficiently pro-Israel academics everywhere.

Yes, that is it, isn’t it – one draws interest from Dershowitz by being “insufficiently pro.”

Curiously, Paisley Currah, in his defense of his political science department – the department that did, ultimately, by unanimous vote rehire Petersen-Overton to teach – a defense that offered that familiar refrain about the non-meaning of the BDS event sponsorship (also conveyed unanimously – not very fractious that Poly Sci department, are they), not only vigorously contested Dershowitz’s arguments, but characterized him, in his objections, to start, as one of “the usual suspects.”

Interesting phrase. Usual suspects? In what?

Currah specializes in queer and transgender issues, but Dershowitz is a full-throated advocate of gay rights, so he can’t be suspect in that area. Dershowitz is also a noted advocate of civil liberties, so in that cannot reside the suspicion.

Is it Israel? Is Dershowitz a “usual suspect” in regard to Israel? In what? In his ardent defense of the nation? Suspect?

What leanings does this glib phrase betray? Oh, and Petersen-Overton, about whom the issue of contention two years ago was his capacity for academic objectivity, against his record of Palestinian advocacy, and a similar body of published work? Writing about BDS just this past October, he said,

In this essay, I take it for granted that Israel’s behavior in the occupied Palestinian territories is characterized by extreme violence and racism, defining qualities of all military occupations. We may or not agree as to the particular details of a desirable settlement, but for those of us uninfluenced by either dogmatic messianism or unrepentant sadism, the occupation must come to an end sooner or later. As activists and scholars who take an interest in human rights, we should be willing to consider the ethical and strategic desirability of all forms of resistance. No discussion should be off-limits.

Here’s to the academic life. And its freedoms.

6 Comments

  • Lawrence Kulak

    THE FASCIST NYPD PLAYED ALONG WITH THIS DISCRIMINATORY PRACTICE BY TELLING ME TO GO TO THE OTHER SIDE OF THE STREET WHEN I WAS HANDING OUT LEAFLETS TO THE BDS PEOPLE. ONE COP WHO LOOKED LIKE A NAZI WANTED TO HARRASS ME WHEN I POINTED TO THE NETUREI KARTA GROUP WHO WERE THERE PROTESTING AND TOLD A GROUP OF COPS THAT PEOPLE LIKE THEM WERE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE HOLOCAUST. ANOTHER COP TOLD ME I HAD TO GO AWAY FROM THE BDS PEOPLE BECAUSE ‘SOMEBODY OBJECTED’. YOU SEE THIS IS HOW FASCISM GETS A ROOT HOLD. RAY KELLY WHO IN MY MIND IS A FASCIST COMMISSIONER DESPITE THE FACT THAT HE ACTS COURTEOUSLY TO JEWS DOES NOT MIND THAT HIS OFFICERS ARE WHOLLY IGNORANT OF THE LAW. IT SEEMS THAT HE WANTS THEM TO REMAIN STUPID SO THAT THEY CAN JUMP TO ANY COMMAND HE GIVES – AND HE HIMSELF IS NOT THAT BRIGHT EITHER. CAN YOU IMAGINE THAT THESE COPS WOULD NOT UNDERSTAND SIMPLE CONCEPTS OF FREEDOM OF SPEECH WHEN THEY ARE THERE TO ENFORCE THAT VERY RIGHT PUTATIVELY BEING ASSERTED BY THE BDS PEOPLE? SO YOU SEE, THE BDS EVEN WAS NOT REALLY ABOUT FREEDOM OF SPEECH AT ALL BECAUSE IT RESULTED IN A DEPRIVATION OF THAT RIGHT BY THE POLICE. THE BDS EVENT WAS ABOUT TRYING TO TRAMPLE THE OPPOSING VIEWPOINTS OF THE OTHER SIDE BY PRESENTING A VIEWPOINT WHICH IN OF ITSELF CURTAILS A RESPONSE BY THE OTHER SIDE BECAUSE IT ADVOCATES ITS DESTRUCTION. THAT IS WHY THE FOUR JEWISH STUDENTS WERE EVICTED FROM THE EVENT BECAUSE IT WAS ABOUT THE VERY OPPOSITE OF FREEDOM OF SPEECH. AND THE FASCIST COPS FOLLOWED SUIT. HERE IS A PERSONAL MESSAGE OT RAY KELLY: TAKE A COURSE IN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND MAYBE YOU WILL COME TO UNDERSTAND THAT JUST BECAUSE THERE ARE PROTEST BARRIERS ERECTED TO KEEP THINGS ORDERLY DOES NOT CURTAIL THE RIGHTS OF ANY INDIVIDUALS TO FREE SPEECH. THEN MAYBE YOU CAN TEACH IT TO YOUR OFFICERS. AS FAR AS BROOKLYN COLLEGE OFFICIALS ARE CONCERNED, THE CITY SHOULD FIRE THE WHOLE FASCIST LOT OF THEM STARTING WITH THAT IMBECILE BIMBO KAREN GOULD.

  • It is sickening that taxpayer money and mandatory student general fees, in part, financed the BDS hatefest at Brooklyn College.

    • A hatefest is when Jerusalem soccer fans chant “kill Arabs” or when an Israeli wears a tee shirt showing a pregnant Palestinian woman in a rifle’s cross hairs with the caption “One Shot, Two Kills”
      The program was no more hateful than Martin Luther King demanding civil rights for blacks in America.

      • Bathsheva Gladstone

        There is a huge difference, and it’s woefully obtuse of you not to see it. One is a singular person voicing his opinion. It is his right to do so, under freedom of speech. Another is the endorsement of propaganda, by a federal and state funded academic institution, and not permitting free speech to reign, by kicking out an opposing view point.

  • The hijacking of academia for political purposes is probably a form of intellectual prostitution to be anticipated. The who, what, where, when and how are acknowledged, perhaps detracted or enhanced to the propagandist’s perscription.

    The causes of this abduction are in the realm of conjecture, deduction and inference, in other words…Why. That is called intelligence or perhaps academic integrity because this involves the consequence of rational prediction based on what has happened not the appearance what is said.

  • richard shdrman

    I am sure Ms Butler admires Heidegger because of his obsession with the beauty of Hitler’s hands.

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