A Different Kind of Holocaust Remembrance (INTERVIEW)

March 25, 2013 3:08 am 6 comments

Latvia's "Legion Day," commemorating the Nazi Waffen-SS, in 2008. Photo: Dezidor/Wikimedia Commons.

“Legion Day” isn’t the type of Holocaust remembrance ceremony that the Jewish community is used to.

Every year on March 16, Latvia hosts a ceremony and march in the country’s capital, Riga, to commemorate Latvian veterans who fought in the Nazi Waffen-SS in a failed 1944 battle against the Soviet Red Army.

Latvian Legionnaires (Waffen-SS veterans) and other Latvian nationalist groups maintain that they have the right to recognize the 1944 battle, but international and Jewish groups have criticized the annual “Legion Day” for honoring the Nazi army. During the Holocaust, the Nazis murdered about 70,000 Jews in Latvia, according to Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust museum. Twenty-five thousand Jews alone were executed in the Rumbula Forest near Riga in 1941 while the Nazis liquidated the Riga ghetto.

Former New York State Assemblyman Richard Brodsky, who just returned from leading a U.S. delegation to Latvia to protest this year’s march, shared his impressions on the march with JNS.org as well as his thoughts on emerging ultra-nationalist movements in Europe–not only those in Latvia, but also the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party in Greece, among others.

JNS.org: As a U.S. lawmaker, how and why did you become involved in the issue of European ultra-nationalism?

Richard Brodsky: “I’ve been active in this kind of thing for over 30 years. I helped arrange delegation of diverse U.S. public officials to protest President Ronald Reagan’s visit to the Kolmeshohe Cemetery in Bitburg, Germany, the burial site of many Waffen-SS soldiers. German President Helmut Kohl asked President Reagan to visit these graves, and it was such an outrage that we flew over and stood in silent protest.

“Frankly this issue is often not taken seriously in America. We picture Nazis as bumbling fools, like in Hogan’s Heroes, or fringe crazy people like George Lincoln Rockwell.  That’s dangerous. I’m part of a group, World Without Nazism, that has members from all over the world and monitors Nazi incidents and organizations all over the world.  We’ll probably go to Washington D.C. this summer to extend the discussion.”

Why did you travel to Latvia to attend the Waffen-SS rally March 16?

“At least 50,000 Jews, Gypsies, mentally ill and political prisoners were murdered, mostly shot, during the war. Members of the Latvian Legion of the Waffen-SS swore personal loyalty to Hitler and had members who were part of death squads.  We focused on the Waffen-SS march in Riga because it was so clearly unacceptable. It was originally an official event but was removed from that status in 2001 after an international outcry. Last week the Latvian Parliament, the Saemia, rejected an attempt to reinstate it. We wanted to thank the Latvian Parliament but also witness for ourselves the resurgence of old and new Nazi efforts. If you speak to Americans, many simply don’t understand that there are genuine, resurgent Nazi movements around the world. Going to see it has been part of an effort to make sure the American public takes it seriously.”

What struck you the most at the rally?

“The large numbers of people honoring the Waffen-SS, including many, many young people, the surviving members of the Waffen-SS wearing their original uniforms, the anger and violence in their faces, the aggressive actions of Members of the Latvian Parliament from political parties that raise up the Waffen-SS, the ability to buy Nazi memorabilia in stores, there are many lasting images. At the same time, we acknowledged that the Seimia had refused to make the march a national holiday, and there are many, many Latvians appalled by the re-emergence of Nazi sympathizers. But the reasonable conclusion from the march is that it is not some weird, bizarre fringe thing; it’s happening all over the word and no one is paying attention.”

The Latvian Waffen-SS Legion marching on Latvian Independence Day, 1943. Photo: German Federal Archives.

Many Latvians who defend this annual event say that because the Latvian Waffen-SS unit was formed in 1943, several years after the Rumbula Massacre, they cannot be blamed. How do you respond to this argument?

“There is a reasonable historical argument about the Latvian Legion. Some were motivated by a desire to oppose Soviet troops; some volunteered; some were drafted; some did nothing wrong that we know of; some were murderers; all swore a personal oath of loyalty to Hitler. The killings of the Jews went on for a long time, some members of the Latvian SS had been members of death squads. But it does not matter to me whether the people I saw helped kill one person or 50,000. One is enough. More importantly, this historical argument has nothing to do with holding a public ceremony to honor the Waffen-SS. Every society has its fringes and we understand that, but these movements are moving to the mainstream. That’s why World Without Nazism has a role to play.”

Why should Americans, and the American Jewish community especially, be concerned with this issue?

“If ‘never again’ means something, it means vigilance and truth telling. These movements are real and growing, and it’s time that the American government addressed this phenomenon. Now is the time for the US to begin to acknowledge these movements, and then to be heard in a responsible but vigilant manner about them. It would be a mistake to make too much of what’s happening, but it would be a bigger mistake to pretend it’s not happening.”

6 Comments

  • Do you have any video of that? I’d care to find out some additional
    information.

  • Impressive the demostration of loyalty the Latvians showed to us on March 16.
    Indeed that the true of what really happened before, during and after WWII is coming out, slowly but steady.

  • Peters Andris

    “Commemorating Nazis” in Latvia is illegal and those that do are arrested. Of course this almost never happens at this parade because it is not in commemoration of the Nazi army. Certain elements wish this were true but they have zero evidence ( no skinheads or other obvious nazi symbols are seen in any photos or videos). The organizers of this event have stated on numerous occasions that this march has nothing to do with Nazis. I agree with the “Latvian”. Some will do anything to make this tiny peace loving nation look bad.

  • This made my day, thanks. I laughed out loud several times while reading the interview.

    Either this guy is the most deluded person I’ve ever come across or he’s a Kremlin stooge who’s being paid to participate in an anti-Latvian smear campaign.

    The Legionnaires day is a mainstream event. It has always been a mainstream event and it will remain a mainstream event despite all these Russian PR campaigns.

    Most Latvians support the commemoration of Latvian veterans and ss long as Latvia is an independent country with basic political freedoms, we will remember our heroes. Just like you do in Israel, the US or Germany.

    All the stuff about Nazis and Holocaust is 100% factually incorrect.

    We hate the Nazis just as much as we hate the Communists, as evidenced by the dozens of anti-Nazi and anti-Stalin placards and posters and signs carried by the participants of the procession.

    • another latvian

      About 3000 people commemorating Nazis in a city of 650,000 – NOT a mainstream.
      US, Israel or Germany do not commemorate troops that swore their loyalties to Hitler.
      The so called “Latvian heroes” did not fight for their independence. Germans never promised Latvians any independence, they just let them be Nazis if they kill enough communists.
      And just for good measure, Peteris Stuchka – the founding father of the judicial system of USSR and its leader for many years as well as Jekabs Peters a second-in-command of so called Cheka behind Dzerzhinsky that preceded KGB, and was responsible for the “red terror” – are both Latvians. Seems like historically Latvians don’t discriminate for which empire and who to kill.

      • First of all, I highly doubt you’re Latvian. Every educated Latvian knows that the Legionnaires weren’t Nazis.

        Sure, some Nazi criminals were a part of the up to 140,000 strong Latvian Waffen-SS units at a distribution not higher than the average number of murderers per capita in any modern society. Extrapolating that the whole generation of Latvians (every single able-bodied, available Latvian male in the given age group) that was drafted into these units was Nazi is EXACTLY like saying that all Americans are child murderers, because there have been several school shootings in the US in the recent years. That’s beyond ludicrous and bordering on the racist.

        Second, yes, it is mainstream, according to opinion polls. Just look it up in Latvian.

        And, yes, they did fight for Latvian independence. Open a history book, read some of their memoirs.

        Your last paragraph pretty much crosses the boundary between what would generally be considered incitement to ethnic hatred in most countries. If the algemeiner servers would be hosted in Latvia, I would file a complaint in the Latvian security police.

        Libel and uninformed opinions are one thing, but calling an entire ethnic group ‘murderers’ is even lower than most other Russian imperialists would go.

Leave a Reply

Please note: comments may be published in the Algemeiner print edition.


Current day month ye@r *

More...

  • Book Reviews Commentary In ‘America in Retreat,’ a Real-Life Risk Board

    In ‘America in Retreat,’ a Real-Life Risk Board

    JNS.org – “Risk: The Game of Strategic Conquest,” the classic Parker Brothers board game, requires imperial ambitions. Players imagine empires and are pitted against each other, vying for world domination. Amid this fictional world war, beginners learn fast that no matter the superiority of their army, every advance is a gamble determined by a roll of the dice. After a defeat, a player must retreat. Weighted reinforcement cards provide the only opportunity to reverse a player’s fortunes and resume the [...]

    Read more →
  • Beliefs and concepts Sports Does Working Out With Other Jews Keep You Jewish?

    Does Working Out With Other Jews Keep You Jewish?

    JNS.org – For Daphna Krupp, her daily workout (excluding Shabbat) at the Jewish Community Center (JCC or “J”) of Greater Baltimore has become somewhat of a ritual. She not only attends fitness classes but also engages with the instructors and plugs the J’s social programs on her personal Facebook page. “It’s the gym and the environment,” says Krupp. “It’s a great social network.” Krupp, who lives in Pikesville, Md., is one of an estimated 1 million American Jewish members of more [...]

    Read more →
  • Sports US & Canada Sports Illustrated Profiles Orthodox NCAA Basketball Player Aaron Liberman

    Sports Illustrated Profiles Orthodox NCAA Basketball Player Aaron Liberman

    Sports Illustrated magazine featured an extensive profile on Orthodox-Jewish college basketball player Aaron Liberman on Wednesday.  The article details Liberman’s efforts to balance faith, academics and basketball at Tulane University, a challenge the young athlete calls “a triple major.” Sports Illustrated pointed out that Liberman is the second Orthodox student to play Division I college basketball. The other was Tamir Goodman, the so-called “Jewish Jordan.” As reported in The Algemeiner, Liberman started his NCAA career at Northwestern University. According to [...]

    Read more →
  • Jewish Identity Sports Cycling the Desert: New Israel Bike Trail Connects Mitzpe Ramon to Eilat

    Cycling the Desert: New Israel Bike Trail Connects Mitzpe Ramon to Eilat

    As the popularity of cycling continues to increase across the world, Israel is working to develop cycling trails that make the country’s spectacular desert accessible to cyclists. The southern segment of the Israel Bike Trail was inaugurated on Feb. 24 and offers for the first time a unique, uninterrupted 8-day cycling experience after six years of planning and development. The southern section of the Israel Bike Trail stretches over 300 kilometers in length and is divided into eight segments for mountain biking, [...]

    Read more →
  • Jewish Identity Theater Forthcoming Major Action Movies Inspired by Jewish Comic Artist Jack Kirby

    Forthcoming Major Action Movies Inspired by Jewish Comic Artist Jack Kirby

    JNS.org – With the recent Oscars in the rearview mirror, Hollywood’s attention now shifts to the rest of this year’s big-screen lineup. Two of the major action films coming up in 2015—Avengers: Age of Ultron, which hits theaters in May, and the third film in the Fantastic Four series, slated for an August release—have Jewish roots that the average moviegoer might be unaware of. As it turns out, it took a tough Jewish kid from New York City’s Lower East [...]

    Read more →
  • Book Reviews Jewish Identity When Torah Teaches Life and Life Teaches Torah (REVIEW)

    When Torah Teaches Life and Life Teaches Torah (REVIEW)

    JNS.org – Rabbi Gordon Tucker spent the first 20 years of his career teaching at the Conservative movement’s Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) and the next 20 years as the rabbi of Temple Israel Center in White Plains, N.Y. I confess that when I heard about the order of those events, I thought that Tucker’s move from academia to the pulpit was strange. Firstly, I could not imagine anyone filling the place of my friend, Arnold Turetsky, who was such a talented [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Blogs Oscars 2015: Reflecting on Love at First Sight

    Oscars 2015: Reflecting on Love at First Sight

    JNS.org – I’m in love, and have been for a long time. It’s a relationship filled with laughter, tears, intrigue, and surprise. It was love at first sight, back when I was a little girl—with an extra-terrestrial that longed to go home. From then on, that love has never wavered, and isn’t reserved for one, but for oh so many—Ferris Bueller, Annie Hall, Tootsie, Harry and Sally, Marty McFly, Atticus Finch, Danny Zuko, Yentl, that little dog Toto, Mrs. Doubtfire, [...]

    Read more →
  • Blogs Book Reviews Examining America’s First Foray into the Middle East (REVIEW)

    Examining America’s First Foray into the Middle East (REVIEW)

    At the turn of the 21st century through today, American involvement in Middle Eastern politics runs through the Central Intelligence Agency. In America’s Great Game: The CIA’s Secret Arabists and the Shaping of the Modern Middle East, historian Hugh Wilford shows this has always been the case. Wilford methodically traces the lives and work of the agency’s three most prominent officers in the Middle East: Kermit “Kim” Roosevelt was the grandson of president Theodore Roosevelt, and the first head of [...]

    Read more →



Sign up now to receive our regular news briefs.