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Anti-Zionism of Fools: What Egypt and the Guardian Can Learn From Israeli Democracy

July 4, 2013 10:37 am 8 comments
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An Israeli Arab votes.

When the nineteenth Israeli Knesset was sworn in March, it represented merely the latest chapter in a 65 year history of non-violent democratic political transitions in the Jewish state.

Though Israelis of course disagree on any number of domestic and foreign policy issues, extremes within the country remain at the margins, and the centre continues to hold.  And, whilst there are factions lobbying for evolutionary change in social policy, and with regard to negotiations with the Palestinians, the country’s economy is exceptionally strong, their democracy remains robust and there is no serious political faction agitating for revolutionary change.

As the dramatic developments unfolding in Egypt now demonstrate, democracy isn’t one single event but rather a persuasion – a political habit of mind nurtured by the behavior of a nation’s citizenry, its cultural, media and religious gatekeepers and political class. It generally can not be imposed by a foreign power, nor brought to life by a (temporary) strongman. Political parties with no ideological propensity towards progressive, representative forms of government can not be trusted to govern in a manner which show fealty towards such democratic norms as the separation of powers, an independent judiciary, and a system of laws which fiercely protect the rights of women, minorities and political dissidents.

As the brief reign of the reactionary movement known as the Muslim Brotherhood shows us, political Islam – as with the Pan-Arabism and statist dictatorships which preceded its rise within the region – is fundamentally at odds with truly liberal political aspirations within the Arab world.

Interestingly, the Guardian earlier today published an editorial not only criticizing the military coup by praising the Muslim Brotherhood as, yes, defenders of constitutional democracy, demonstrating again – as with their defense of Hamas’ ‘democratic’ legitimacy – the institution’s inability to recognize the difference between democrats (those who seek representative forms of government) and demopaths (those who seek democratic legitimacy in order to destroy liberal society). As one Arab pundit recently observed about Morsi’s ‘reforms’ which had the effect of merely solidifying Brotherhood control of the country and codifying illiberal Islamist doctrine: “Morsi proved that political Islam seeks to use democracy only to seize power only to bury the democratic dream later.”

Additionally, if the strength of a democracy can in part be measured by how well the nation treats the proverbial ‘other’, Morsi’s government – which nurtured a society in which the beleaguered Christians and Bahais (and even Shiites) faced increasing discrimination and violence – failed miserably.  Further, while it may be a bit cliché to note that the health of a society can be gauged by how well they treat their Jewish minority, the following passage, from an essay written by a Muslim named Ahmed Hashemi, commenting on the increased antisemitism in Egypt (a nation with a Jewish population of, at most, 40) after the revolution, rings true.

…if we are going to establish a healthy, tolerant society that respects differences, and pursues a pluralistic democracy, we have to accept that Jews and the Jewish community have been part and parcel of our own communities. This affirmation of coexistence represents the essence of today’s civilization. An ‘Arab Spring’ without religious tolerance that rests on strong anti-Semitic attitudes cannot bring about genuine democracy and freedom. In a peaceful and democratic Middle East, everyone can prosper and flourish.

In reading the Guardian daily, it seems that the most pronounced effect stemming from their largely uncritical advocacy on behalf of Arabs (including Palestinian Arabs), and their hostility towards Zionism, relates not to its injurious influence on Israel, but the harm it inflicts upon their Arab protagonists by legitimizing their sense of victimhood and their immutable grievances against the Jews.

As the most successful democracy in the region, Hashemi added, “possessing a strong and diversified economy and a dynamic multiparty political system in a tyranny-affected region, Israel can be a role model.”

The Guardian’s ideologically inspired legitimization of the Arab world’s hostility towards Israel nurtures their continuing social pathos and sclerotic economies, and ensures that, whatever party takes power in the next Egyptian government, the shining example of diversity, tolerance and sober, reflective and liberal self-government to their north will never be leveraged to their advantage.

The anti-Zionism of fools makes it more probably that the ‘Arab Spring’ will continue to be merely a chimera.

8 Comments

  • Elliot J. Stamler

    This excellent article makes me proud to be supporter/contributor to CAMERA. There will not be peace in the Holy Land any time in the lifetime of any of us (including me) over the age 0f 50-perhaps never in any reader’s lifetime. Ahmed Hashemi seems like a fine man but he is an anomaly amongst Arabs.

  • Jill Schaeffer

    I disagree with JB Silver: The Guardian should realize how wrong they are. I’m wearying of the left trying to out left the left it left behind and side with murder and mayhem. Enough already. Russia supports Iran, the United States, Egypt. Neither is Arab. Both want a caliphate in the region. Israel is an inconvenient truth that democracy (a real one) actually works over there. A scandal to the other nations, particularly those who salivate for totalitarianism and call it anything else that sells.

  • Masterful analysis, Adam. Really enjoyed the cool, sharp knife you took to surgically remove tired, stale yet unexamined leftist tropes from what passes for conventional wisdom. Keep up the good writing. Shabbat Shalom!

  • I think one thing lacking in Egypt that’s essential for democracy is a well educated citizenry. The American Founders understood this.

  • Isaac Barr MD

    My Comment in the Guardian: Hitler was democratically elected. A bad president, Bashar al-Assad, responsible to 100.000 dead, has Guardian support? What about Qaddafi? With the “Brotherhood” Shariah destruction of Egypt economy and their support of terror group Hamas and other terror groups the democratic elected president Morsi had to be replaced.

  • In the last decade appx 8000 Palestinians have been killed by Israeli forces- and that includes ‘resistance’ fighters and militia.

    In the last decade over 5,000,000 have been slaughtered in Africa.

    In the last 2 years more Arabs have been killed by Bashar Assad than have been killed by Israel in the last 65 years- and that includes soldiers killed on the battlefield in every Arab-Israeli war.

    Talk of ‘Justice’ and ‘care’ and ‘humanitarianism’ make me laugh.

    For the most part, Africans are black and Israelis are Jews.

    Seems the only ones who can’t connect the dots are progressive Jews, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

    Once and for all we can lay to rest the stereotype that all Jews are smart.

  • A wonderful, insightful article. A pity that the Guardian writers and editors will never read it, or, if they do, never understand it, since it tells plain, simple truths.
    G-D Forbid they should realise how wrong they are.
    JB Silver

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