Hanukkah Recipes From ‘Queen of Kosher’ Jamie Geller

December 3, 2013 11:16 am 0 comments

Cardamon-sceneted Hanukkah cookies, by Jamie Geller. Photo: From the forthcoming book “JOY OF KOSHER: Fast, Fresh Family Recipes by Jamie Geller.”

JNS.orgAll kinds of uber-creative latke recipes appear around Hanukkah-time: apple-parsnip latkes, sweet potato-leek latkes, sweet cheesy latkes, and savory cheese and chive latkes. But the truth is, you can’t go anywhere in the world of latkes until you’ve mastered the classic potato version, says celebrity chef Jamie Geller, who likes to try the latkes, keep them warm, and then layer them with show-stopping toppings.

Hailed as the “Queen of Kosher” and the “Jewish Rachael Ray,” Geller is the co-founder of the Kosher Media Network, publisher of the Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller magazine and companion website JoyofKosher.com, and author of the “Quick & Kosher” cookbook series. Geller’s online cooking videos have garnered more than half a million views.

The following two recipes for Hanukkah latkes and cookies are from “Joy of Kosher,”  Geller’s new cookbook that will be published in October, and were edited by JNS.org.

Latkes with Caviar and Cream

Kosher Status: Dairy

Prep Time: 15 Minutes

Cook Time: 40 Minutes

Total Time: 55 Minutes

Yield: 20 latkes

Consider creating a latke-topping bar, so your Hanukkah party guests can mix and match or try them all. I [Who is "I"?  Geller? If so, we are reproducing not editing the recipes.  Unless we're reproducing with modifications?] like topping latkes with guacamole and an over-easy or poached egg, or doing Caprese latke towers with slices of mozzarella and tomato, plus a few fresh basil leaves. Oooo, and I love a smear of brie cheese topped with a dollop of jam, or blue cheese, pear, and arugula piled on top. You can go exotic or country or Brooklyn, but this super elegant cream and caviar version can only be described as super posh and simply divine.

Ingredients

4 large russet potatoes (about 2 1/2 pounds)

3 large eggs, beaten

2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Canola oil for frying

1 medium onion quartered

1/4 cup Manischewitz® Matzo Meal

1 1/4 cups crème frâiche or sour cream

Caviar, for garnish

Directions:

1. Fill a large bowl with cold water. Peel the potatoes, cut them into quarters lengthwise, and place them in the bowl of cold water to prevent browning.

2. Combine the eggs, salt, and pepper in a large bowl; set aside.

3. Heat about 1 inch of oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat.

4. Put the onions and potatoes in a food processor and pulse until pureed. Transfer the mixture into the large bowl with the eggs. Add Manischewitz® Matzo Meal and mix to combine.

5. Line a baking sheet with paper towels.

6. Using a 1/4-cup measuring cup, scoop up the potato mixture and carefully drop it into the hot oil. Use the back of the measuring cup to flatten the latke. Fill the pan with as many latkes as you can, but do not let them touch. Do not overcrowd your pan, or the latkes will be soggy instead of crispy. Fry until golden brown and crispy, three to five minutes per side. Drain on the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with remaining batter.

7. To keep latkes warm and crispy once fried, spread them in a single layer on a baking sheet and place in a 200°F oven until ready to serve.

8. To serve, place the latkes on a large serving tray and garnish each with a generous tablespoon of crème frâiche and caviar.

Quick Tip:

Remember, don’t overcrowd your pan when frying. Make sure the latkes aren’t touching and there is room around each for the edges to crisp. That’s the perfect latke: soft, fluffy, and creamy on the inside with crispy edges.

Sweet Cinnamon Latkes:

My friend Anita’s grandmother used to make her latkes with a pinch of cinnamon.

Omit the onion and the pepper, reduce the salt to a pinch, and add 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon and 3 tablespoons sugar. Mix 1 cup sour cream with 1/4 cup maple syrup and serve it on the side.

Make it Pareve:

Use soy sour cream or serve with applesauce.

Cardamom-Scented Hanukkah Cookies

Kosher Status: Dairy

Prep: 10 minutes

Chill: 30 minutes

Bake: 12 minutes

Cool: 10 minutes

Total: 1 hour 2 minutes

Yield: About twenty-four 2-inch cookies

I really feel like a good mom when I bake with my kids, especially for the holidays. Hanukkah cookies can also be a lot of fun to make, but they’re usually so blah and one-dimensional, no one really craves them. With just one touch of cardamom, this recipe immediately transforms those bland little cookies into something super special. You don’t even need to decorate them. Just pile them on your party  tray and watch them go!

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter at room temperature

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1/4 cup packed light brown sugar

1 large egg

1 tablespoon fresh orange juice

1 cup confectioner’s sugar

Blue sugar or sprinkles, for decorating

Directions:

1. Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, cardamom, and ginger in a small bowl. Beat together the butter, granulated sugar, and brown sugar with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add the egg and orange juice and beat until combined. Add the flour mixture and mix just until incorporated.

2. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for 15 to 30 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Lightly flour your work surface.

4. Flour your rolling pin and cookie cutters. Roll out the dough to 1/4-inch thick on the work surface. Cut into desires shapes and place them on the prepared baking sheets. Reroll the scraps and continue until all the dough has been used. Bake until the edges are just golden, 10 to 12 minutes. Cool two minutes on the baking sheet, then move to a wire rack to cool completely.

5. Place the confectioners’ sugar in a small bowl. Add water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and whisk until a smooth, thick but pourable consistency is reached. Drizzle the frosting on the cookies and decorate them with blue sugar or sprinkles.

Variation:

Use 1 cup all-purpose flour and 1/2 cup whole wheat flour, or 3/4 of each.

Black and White Chocolate – Dipped Hanukkah Cookies:

To make Chocolate Ganache¸ bring 1 cup of heavy cream to a simmer in a small saucepan over medium heat. Place 4 ounces chopped milk chocolate in a small bowl and 4 ounces chopped white chocolate in another small bowl. Pour half of the warm cream into each bowl. Let sit for a few minutes, then stir with rubber spatulas to melt the chocolates. Let cool slightly before dipping your cookies. Divide the cookies into two equal batches. Dip the cookies in one batch in the milk chocolate, covering each cookie halfway; dip the cookies in a second batch in the white chocolate, dipping each cookie halfway. Sprinkle the frosted parts of the cookies with gold and silver decorating sugar.

Make it Pareve:

These are so easy to make nondairy: just sub in margarine for butter. Because it’s traditional to eat dairy delicacies on Hanukkah, and I rarely have occasion to make dairy desserts, I seize the opportunity to use butter in this recipe. But it’s a great quick cookie recipe and shouldn’t be relegated to Hanukkah—just use cookie cutters that are not holiday themed.

From the forthcoming book “JOY OF KOSHER: Fast, Fresh Family Recipes by Jamie Geller.” Copyright (c) 2013 by JamieGeller. To be published on October 15, 2013 by William Morrow Cookbooks, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers. Reprinted with permission.

Leave a Reply

Please note: comments may be published in the Algemeiner print edition.


Current day month ye@r *

More...

  • Arts and Culture Middle East Hamas Commander Reportedly Urges Hezbollah to Join Forces Against Israel

    Hamas Commander Reportedly Urges Hezbollah to Join Forces Against Israel

    JNS.org – Five months after Israeli forces tried to assassinate Hamas military commander Mohammed Deif in Gaza, Deif appears to have signed a letter that the terrorist group claims he wrote in hiding. The letter, addressed to Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah, expressed Deif’s condolences for the death of Hezbollah terrorists during Sunday’s reported Israeli airstrike in Syria. Deif is said to have survived multiple assassination attempts, but he has not been seen in public for years. According to the Hezbollah-linked Al-Manar [...]

    Read more →
  • Jewish Identity Theater Shlomo Carlebach Musical Has the Soul to Heal Frayed Race Relations

    Shlomo Carlebach Musical Has the Soul to Heal Frayed Race Relations

    JNS.org – The cracks that had been simply painted over for so long began to show in Ferguson, Mo., in November 2014, but in truth they had begun to open wide much earlier—on Saturday, July 13, 2013. That is when a jury in Sanford, Fla., acquitted George Zimmerman of culpability for the death of a 17-year-old black man, Trayvon Martin. The cracks receded from view over time, as other news obscured them. Then came the evening of Aug. 9, 2014, [...]

    Read more →
  • Theater US & Canada ‘Homeland’ Season Finale Stirs Controversy After Comparing Menachem Begin to Taliban Leader

    ‘Homeland’ Season Finale Stirs Controversy After Comparing Menachem Begin to Taliban Leader

    A controversial scene in the season finale of Homeland sparked outrage by comparing former Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin to a fictional Taliban leader, the UK’s Daily Mail reported. In the season 4 finale episode, which aired on Dec. 21, CIA black ops director Dar Adal, played by F. Murray Abraham, justifies a deal he made with a Taliban leader by referencing Begin. He makes the remarks in a conversation with former CIA director Saul Berenson, a Jewish character played by Mandy [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Spirituality/Tradition Placing Matisyahu Back Within a Life of Observance

    Placing Matisyahu Back Within a Life of Observance

    Shining Light on Fiction During the North Korea-Sony saga, we learned two important lessons. The first is that there are two sides to this story, and neither of them are correct because ultimately we should have neither inappropriate movies nor dictators. The second is that we cannot remain entirely fixed on the religious world, but we also must see beyond the external, secular view of reality. It’s important to ground our Torah-based thoughts into real-life activism. To view our act [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Blogs Nine Decades of Moses at the Movies

    Nine Decades of Moses at the Movies

    JNS.org – Hollywood has had its share of big-budget biblical flops, but until now, the Exodus narrative has not been among them. Studios have brought Moses to the big screen sparingly, but in ways that defined the image and character of Moses for each generation of audiences. The first biblical epic In 1923, director Cecil B. DeMille left it to the American public to decide the subject of his next movie for Paramount. DeMille received a letter from a mechanic [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Blogs Exodus on Screen (REVIEW)

    Exodus on Screen (REVIEW)

    JNS.org – The story of the Exodus from Egypt is a tale as old as time itself, to borrow a turn of phrase. It’s retold every Passover, both at the seder table and whenever “The Ten Commandments” is aired on television. But the latest adaptation—Ridley Scott’s epic film, “Exodus: Gods and Kings”—fails to meet expectations. Scott’s “Exodus” alters the source material to service the story and ground the tale, but the attempt to reinvent the biblical narrative becomes laughable. Moses [...]

    Read more →
  • Jewish Identity Lifestyle ‘Jewish Food Movement’ Comes of Age

    ‘Jewish Food Movement’ Comes of Age

    JNS.org - In December 2007, leaders of the Hazon nonprofit drafted seven-year goals for what they coined as the “Jewish Food Movement,” which has since been characterized by the increased prioritization of healthy eating, sustainable agriculture, and food-related activism in the Jewish community. What do the next seven years hold in store? “One thing I would like to see happen in the next seven years is [regarding] the issue of sugar, soda, and obesity, [seeing] what would it be like to rally the [...]

    Read more →
  • Blogs Education Seeds of ‘Start-Up Nation’ Cultivated by Israel Sci-Tech Schools

    Seeds of ‘Start-Up Nation’ Cultivated by Israel Sci-Tech Schools

    JNS.org – Forget the dioramas. How about working on an Israeli Air Force drone? That’s exactly the kind of beyond-their-years access enjoyed by students at the Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) industrial vocational high school run by Israel Sci-Tech Schools, the largest education network in the Jewish state. More than 300 students (250 on the high school level and 68 at a two-year vocational academy) get hands-on training in the disciplines of aviation mechanics, electricity and energy control, and unmanned air [...]

    Read more →



Sign up now to receive our regular news briefs.