Execution Inc.: A Tutorial for Peter Beaumont on Iran’s ‘Moderate’ Leader

December 4, 2013 11:00 pm 5 comments

President Hassan Rouhani. Photo: Iranian government.

Peter Beaumont, foreign affairs editor for the Guardian and Observer, argued in a November 30 article that the interim deal inked in Geneva between Iran and the world’s six leading powers could, “redraw the map of an area that has been gripped by conflict or the threat of conflict for generations.”  Specifically with regards to Israel, Beaumont notes that “An Iran a step further back from conflict with Israel, and potentially minded to meddle less in the region, would be a good thing if Tehran sticks to its part of the deal.”

Beaumont is placing his faith in a regime founded on the systematic suppression of Iranian citizens and dissidents – a nearly thirty-five year record of domestic oppression, which has been facilitated to a large extent by a decidedly expansionist foreign policy. Indeed, creating scapegoats - such as Iraq, Israel, and the United States - for tens of millions of Iranians to project their rage and misery at allows Iran’s ruling clerics to legitimize their barbarity under the cloak of religion.

Beaumont believes that the “…diplomacy that led to the interim six-month agreement is the first indication that [Iran’s] new president Hassan Rouhani now sees the benefit of negotiating solutions to the region’s problems.”

However, Rouhani’s domestic policy to date is one marked by executions, persecution, torture, denial of political rights, and a general assault on the rule of law.

Frequently hailed at the Guardian as a moderate and a pragmatist, the Iranian leader’s actions over the course of his first 100 days in office leave little doubt that behind the diplomatic window dressing, little has changed. In fact, since Rouhani’s election, the rate of executions has actually accelerated.  Iran’s regime imposed the death penalty on more than 200 people during Rouhani’s tenure, including a record number of 50 executions during a two-week period in September. So far in 2013, Iran has executed more than 400 of its citizens.

Ahmed Shaheed, the UN special rapporteur on human rights in Iran, said in a report presented to the General Assembly on October 31 that he’s “alarmed by the spate of executions.”

And while Rouhani’s rhetoric inspired hope in Geneva, it is not being matched by his regime’s draconian policies vis-a-vis Iran’s minorities. The “best hope for peace in our time’s” government continues to disregard the rights of its Christians, Bahais, Sufis, Jews, and members of other religious groups. Furthermore, homosexuality under Iranian law remains punishable by imprisonment and even the death penalty.

Yet, just when this bloody tyranny was beginning to wobble as a result of a crippling sanctions regime that was battering the nation’s economy, the thuggish Mullahs were handed a lifeline: the release of approximately $7 billion – a sum equivalent to 1.4 percent of Iran’s entire national income.

As a result of this partial lifting of sanctions, Beaumont postulates that “Tehran’s clerical regime might now see the benefit of negotiating solutions to the region’s problems, rather than its previous angry posturing…”.

Yet the tone inside Iran has been anything but conciliatory. Here’s a direct quote from the state-controlled Press TV: “…but so far with the Geneva joint plan, the knife has scarcely been pulled out [of Iran’s economic back] three inches.”

Has ‘conflict resolution’ ever sounded more ominous?

This article was originally published by CIF Watch.

5 Comments

  • I guess someone forgot to inform Peter Beaumont that Teheran is actively engaged in Lebanon via its proxy Hezbollah, Syria via its proxy Bashar al Asad, or coordinating Iraqi Shia militias…I guess war by proxy doesn’t count in Peter Beaumont’s book.

  • Fritz Kohlhaas

    Typical Guardian nonsense.

  • Lawrence Kulak

    It is indeed hard to fathom how even before Rouhani and the escalation of Iran’s execution rate of its citizens, that the Iranian regime could have been considered to be less brutal to its own citizens than the deposed Iraqi regime under Saddam Hussein. Why aren’t we defending the Iranian people from this kind of persecution? Everybody knows that most of those 4oo people – many whom were hung from a crain and suffered a slow, agonizing death were completely innocent. What happened to this country’s sense of moral righteousness. Did we only invade Iraq because Saddam threatened the elder Bush’s life? George W. did conspicuously leave out Iran when it came to military engagement despite labeling them as one of the axises of evil. Food for thought.

  • Great piece but preaching to the converted. Send this to John Kerry and his merry band of idiots.

  • Israel must never depend on Obama and Kerry, both of whom hate the Jewish State. Israel must destroy Iran’s nuclear program NOW!

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