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December 27, 2010 12:56 am

Art for Heart’s Sake – Reuth Dinner at Sotheby’s

avatar by Natalie Braier

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Event guests Miriam Frankel, Dr. Nissim Ohana and Eva Haberman.

A feast for the eye and palette awaited the intimate gathering at Reuth’s dinner at Sotheby’s.  Guests basked in an air of understated elegance as they sampled an array of cuisine and previewed the catalogue of Israeli and international art Sotheby’s will auction on December 15th.

Reuth is one of Israel’s oldest non-profits and for over 70 years it has been providing community housing, senior homes and day centers.  The jewel in Reuth’s crown is its state of the art Medical Center in Tel Aviv which focuses on rehabilitation care for the elderly and injured.  Following a warm address by Meirav Mandlebaum, Reuth’s global chairperson, Rivka Saker, Sotheby’s senior director in Israel, chronicled a history of Israel’s contemporary art movement spanned by the birth of Boris Schatz’s Bezalel academy in 1903 to its significant role on the modern day international scene.

Dr. Nissim Ohana, the event’s guest speaker, emphasized the organization’s focus on the dignity of the individual and offered a taste of the opportunities and daily challenges that he faces as the medical center’s director. Ultimately, the Doctor’s resolve to be the voice of those who rely on Reuth for their future is his first hand knowledge of the power of rehab to rebuild lives.

Guests then enjoyed a little auction action of their own when Jennifer Roth, a 25 year Sotheby’s veteran, enthusiastically encouraged and accepted bids to renovate a holocaust survivor’s studio, supply new wheelchairs and brighten the lives of patients through art therapy.  Dinner proceeds will be directed at rebuilding the Reuth Medical Center’s geriatric rehabilitation department.

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