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February 8, 2012 2:56 pm

Israeli Air Force Trades Fighter Aircraft for Trees on Tu’Bshvat

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An IAF Blackhawk helicopter on the ground in the middle of a field. Photo: wiki commons.

Today is Tu’Bshvat.  The Jewish holiday which celebrates the renewal of nature each year is being celebrated by the Israeli Air Force across the country, with gardens being refurbished and trees being planted from the north to the south.

“The Knights of the Double Tail”, stationed at the Tel-Nof airbase hosted students from a local school to plant trees in honor of fallen comrades.  The base welcomed Gilad Shalit back to Israel following his release from captivity in exchange for over a thousand Palestinian prisoners.

“We cooperate with the boarding school year-round, and were happy to collaborate with them in planting as well”, said Corporal Tamar Fogel. “In addition, we’ve wanted to tend to our garden for a while so we integrated our plans with the holiday”.

Children were also welcomed at At Ovda airport, used by both military and commercial aircraft, to plant trees and eat fruit with IAF personnel stationed

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The firefighting unit at Sde-Dov airbase, located in Northern Israel, which is responsible for dealing with forest fires, will also be planting trees.

“It’s only natural that on Tu Bshvat, we as the firefighting unit will go out and plant”, said  Lieutenant Colonel Rami. “Our cooperation with the Jewish National Fund goes on year-round, even on holidays and joyous days”.

To read more and see pictures of the events, click here.

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