Monday, December 17th | 9 Tevet 5779

Subscribe
February 15, 2012 2:29 pm

Incoming New York Times Jerusalem Chief Sparks Controversy via Twitter

avatar by Zachary Lichaa

Email a copy of "Incoming New York Times Jerusalem Chief Sparks Controversy via Twitter" to a friend

Jodi Ruderon, incoming NY Times Jerusalem Bureau chief. Photo: @rudoren via Twitter.

Following the New York Times decision to move Ethan Bronner from his post as the Jerusalem Bureau Chief, the paper that publishes “All the News That’s Fit to Print” hired Jodi Rudoren to replace him.

Before arriving at her new job, Rudoren has already sparked considerable discussion over tweets she made following the announcement of her forthcoming position.  Writing to Ali Abunimah, the founder of Electronic Intifada, Ruderon tweeted:

“Hey there. Would love to chat sometime. About things other than the house. My friend Kareem Fahim says good things”

In addition, Rudoren retweeted an article entitled “Palestine: Love in the Time of Apartheid”, which begins by saying “Israel’s occupation of Palestinian land and their draconian citizenship laws now threatend one of the most basic of human bonds, love.”

Ruderon’s decision to post tweets aimed at one side of the struggle for peace, directly after the announcement that she’ll be running the Jerusalem bureau for America’s most widely read online news publication isn’t sitting well with some.

Jeffrey Goldberg at The Atlantic writes that Rudoren should “stop tweeting as if she’s a J Street official and remember that she has to develop sources on all sides of the conflict,” while Marc Tracy at Tablet proclaims “Only a fool would expect a reporter to have no opinions, but we expect them to zip their opinions up in favor of objectivity and to come to new stories with an open mind; Rudoren is already damaging her readers’ trust.”

The new Jerusalem bureau chief replied to those concerned with her recent tweeting, writing:

“Thanks for all the new folos, and the advice re Tweeting. Plan to Tweet from all sides of conflict. Welcome suggestions of other books.”

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner

Algemeiner.com