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July 17, 2012 9:10 am

Famous Mossad Spy Killed in Freak Bike Accident

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Mordechai Vanunu. Photo: wiki commons.

After years of escaping death as one of the Mossad’s most famous agents, Giora Tzahor was killed on Monday while riding his bicycle in Israel.

Tzahor’s notable operations include the destruction of multiple Jordanian tanks during the Six-Day War, despite being outnumbered by Jordanian forces, and his role in the capture of Mordechai Vanunu, the Israeli nuclear technician who passed state information about Israel’s nuclear program to the London Sunday Times in 1986.

In the 1970’s, Tzahor was appointed Deputy Director of the Mossad’s “Spear” Unit, which has been referred to by media publications as the Mossad’s assassination group.  He later became the director of the “Spear” (Kidon) Unit.

Born in Europe in 1941, Tzahor immigrated to Israel a year after he made his first trip to the Jewish state, when he was 17.  He will be laid to rest in Israel on Tuesday evening.

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  • Pet Rover

    Why include a photo of Vanunu with this obituary?

    • Fortunee

      One should always know what an enemy of Israel looks like.

  • Strange…this is the second bike crash of a well known Israeli citizen in the last few days:

    Bicycle crash victim was renowned scientist

    http://www.contracostatimes.com/ci_21076320/bicyclist-killed-berkeley-crash-was-rewowned-israeli-psychology?source=most_viewed
    By Chris De Benedetti and Natalie Neysa Alund, Oakland Tribune
    7/14/2012 08:23:28 PM PDT

    Click photo to enlarge
    []
    Professor Shlomo Bentin, a renowned Israeli psychology professor, was killed when his bicycle…
    Share condolences
    Sign or read a guest book in memory of Shlomo Bentin
    Related
    Bicyclist dies after possibly being hit by a dump truck in downtown Berkeley

    The bicyclist who died Friday after colliding with a dump truck in downtown Berkeley was a renowned Israeli psychology professor, authorities said.

    Shlomo Bentin, 65, was riding his bicycle in the 2100 block of Bancroft Way, west of Fulton Street, about 3:40 p.m. when the crash occurred, an Alameda County Coroner’s Bureau official said.

    Bentin was wearing a helmet, which was shattered in the crash, police said. He was transported to Highland Hospital in Oakland, where he died at 4:14 p.m., authorities said.

    After the crash, some witnesses asked a passing motorcyclist to go after the truck because they believed the driver unknowingly hit him. The truck returned to the scene, and the driver was interviewed by police. The collision is under investigation, and police said there is also a chance Bentin crashed into a parked vehicle.

    He is survived by his wife, Miri, three children and seven grandchildren, colleagues said.

    Bentin was a professor of psychology and education at Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel. In April, he was awarded the Israel Prize in Psychology in a special Israel Independence Day ceremony in Jerusalem.

    He also frequently visited UC Berkeley, where he conducted research experiments while collaborating with several professors.

    Colleagues around the globe Saturday remembered Bentin as a towering figure in his field of neuropsychology and as a family man with a restless intellect who enjoyed travel, good food and wine.

    “Shlomo was a giant figure in human brain research with a long and distinguished record of accomplishments providing seminal insights into how the human brain works,” said Robert T. Knight, a UC Berkeley professor of psychology and neuroscience. “We lost a great friend, a great human being and a stellar scientist.”

    Bentin was one of the founders of Hebrew University’s Interdisciplinary Center for Neural Computation and of the Cognitive Electrophysiology Laboratory (YIKES!), which promoted research in neuroscience and neuropsychology, said Leon Deouell, chairman of the psychology department at the university.

    “He made numerous contributions to science and the community, from initiating programs for clinical neuropsychology to changing the way reading is taught in elementary schools, based on scientific research,” Deouell said.

    Ayelet Landau, who studied with Bentin in Jerusalem and earned a Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, said Bentin had a charismatic and warm personality that made working with him a unique experience.

    “His enthusiasm was contagious, and his caring and warm personality generated a very special lab environment,” Landau said in an email sent from Germany. “The lab felt very much like one big family. He cared, nurtured and promoted his students relentlessly.”

    Bentin recently had been working with UC Berkeley professor Lynn Robertson on a project that focused on neuropsychology and visual perception and was funded with a grant by the National Institutes of Health, colleagues said.

    “He will be missed by many people all over the world,” Landau said.

    Contact Chris De Benedetti at 510-353-7011 and Natalie Neysa Alund at 510-293-2469.

  • Very strange. The second well known Jewish man to be killed in a “bike accident” in the last few days. Shlomo Bentin died recently in Berkeley, CA while riding his bike:

    Bicycle crash victim was renowned scientist

    http://www.contracostatimes.com/ci_21076320/bicyclist-killed-berkeley-crash-was-rewowned-israeli-psychology?source=most_viewed

    By Chris De Benedetti and Natalie Neysa Alund, Oakland Tribune
    7/14/2012 08:23:28 PM PDT

    Bicyclist dies after possibly being hit by a dump truck in downtown Berkeley

    The bicyclist who died Friday after colliding with a dump truck in downtown Berkeley was a renowned Israeli psychology professor, authorities said.

    Shlomo Bentin, 65, was riding his bicycle in the 2100 block of Bancroft Way, west of Fulton Street, about 3:40 p.m. when the crash occurred, an Alameda County Coroner’s Bureau official said.

    Bentin was wearing a helmet, which was shattered in the crash, police said. He was transported to Highland Hospital in Oakland, where he died at 4:14 p.m., authorities said.

    After the crash, some witnesses asked a passing motorcyclist to go after the truck because they believed the driver unknowingly hit him. The truck returned to the scene, and the driver was interviewed by police. The collision is under investigation, and police said there is also a chance Bentin crashed into a parked vehicle.

    He is survived by his wife, Miri, three children and seven grandchildren, colleagues said.

    Bentin was a professor of psychology and education at Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel. In April, he was awarded the Israel Prize in Psychology in a special Israel Independence Day ceremony in Jerusalem.

    He also frequently visited UC Berkeley, where he conducted research experiments while collaborating with several professors.

    Colleagues around the globe Saturday remembered Bentin as a towering figure in his field of neuropsychology and as a family man with a restless intellect who enjoyed travel, good food and wine.

    “Shlomo was a giant figure in human brain research with a long and distinguished record of accomplishments providing seminal insights into how the human brain works,” said Robert T. Knight, a UC Berkeley professor of psychology and neuroscience. “We lost a great friend, a great human being and a stellar scientist.”

    Bentin was one of the founders of Hebrew University’s Interdisciplinary Center for Neural Computation and of the Cognitive Electrophysiology Laboratory (YIKES!), which promoted research in neuroscience and neuropsychology, said Leon Deouell, chairman of the psychology department at the university.

    “He made numerous contributions to science and the community, from initiating programs for clinical neuropsychology to changing the way reading is taught in elementary schools, based on scientific research,” Deouell said.

    Ayelet Landau, who studied with Bentin in Jerusalem and earned a Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, said Bentin had a charismatic and warm personality that made working with him a unique experience.

    “His enthusiasm was contagious, and his caring and warm personality generated a very special lab environment,” Landau said in an email sent from Germany. “The lab felt very much like one big family. He cared, nurtured and promoted his students relentlessly.”

    Bentin recently had been working with UC Berkeley professor Lynn Robertson on a project that focused on neuropsychology and visual perception and was funded with a grant by the National Institutes of Health, colleagues said.

    “He will be missed by many people all over the world,” Landau said.

    Contact Chris De Benedetti at 510-353-7011 and Natalie Neysa Alund at 510-293-2469.

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