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September 19, 2012 1:33 pm

RJC Kicks off Swing State TV ads with Jews who Regret Choosing Obama

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New Jersey voter Michael Goldstein speaks of his decision to support Barack Obama in the 2008 election and his change of heart for the 2012 race on an ad for the Republican Jewish Coalition. Photo: RJC.

The Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) on Wednesday kicked off the television phase of its “My Buyer’s Remorse” advertising campaign, featuring the testimony of Jews who regret voting for Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential election.

Appearing on broadcasts in the critical election swing states of Florida, Ohio, Nevada, and Pennsylvania, the ads will run through Nov. 5. New Jersey voter Michael Goldstein—the subject of the first ad—says Obama’s May 2011 statement that the 1967 borders should be a starting point for Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations “really changed” his mind about the president, then goes on to cite economic reasons for his change of heart.

“The jobs numbers are terrible, the unemployment rates are as high or higher than they were when Obama took over,” Goldstein says.

RJC Executive Director Matt Brooks said in a statement that the ads “give voice to the nagging doubts that many Jewish voters feel about President Obama.”

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), however, released a statement before Rosh Hashanah including Obama in its praise for the “close and unshakeable partnership between the United States and Israel.” AIPAC said U.S.-Israel security cooperation “has reached unprecedented levels.”

“President Obama and the bipartisan, bicameral congressional leadership have deepened America’s support for Israel in difficult times,” the pro-Israel lobby said.

The RJC’s effort to sway Jewish voters in swing states has also included billboard ads reading “Obama…Oy Vey!!”

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