Saturday, October 21st | 1 Heshvan 5778

Close

Be in the know!

Get our exclusive daily news briefing.

Subscribe
October 13, 2012 11:16 am

Clinton: US Must Look Past “Arab Spring” Violence to Boost Democracies

avatar by News Editor

Email a copy of "Clinton: US Must Look Past “Arab Spring” Violence to Boost Democracies" to a friend

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Photo: Chad J. McNeeley at DoD.

JPost – WASHINGTON – The United States must look past the violence and extremism that has erupted after the “Arab Spring” revolutions and boost support for the region’s young democracies to forge long-term security, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on Friday.

Clinton, seeking to reinforce the Obama administration’s Middle East policy following a wave of anti-American violence and last month’s deadly attack on the US mission in Benghazi, Libya, said Washington cannot be deterred by “the violent acts of a small number of extremists.”

Read full story.

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner
  • Lawerence Kulak

    This might be wishful thinking on behalf of Clinton. There is obviously a reason why the middle east has been so prone to dictatorship and anti-democratic movements and that reason is probably Islam. You cannot have democracy where there is constant theocratic pressure from extremist groups and dictatorships arise in order to stop the moderate and extremist elements from killing each other. The moderates may lean toward maintaining democratic institutions but they will constantly be targeted for attack by religious fanatics.
    This is why the US should never have gone ‘into’ Iraq. If you are going to take on an Islamic country you do it from the sky like the US did in 1991 when it came to the aid of Kuwait. You don’t walk into a hornet’s nest where there are so many rival factions that you can never be sure who is your friend and who is your enemy. And like the Navy Seal who took out Bin Laden said on sixty minutes, “you don’t run to your death.”

Algemeiner.com