Wednesday, September 26th | 17 Tishri 5779

Subscribe
January 16, 2013 6:20 pm

Former Baseball Pro Claims Holocaust Would Not Have Happened if Jews “Had the Right to Bear Arms”

avatar by Zach Pontz

Email a copy of "Former Baseball Pro Claims Holocaust Would Not Have Happened if Jews “Had the Right to Bear Arms”" to a friend

Survivors of the Mauthausen concentration camp cheer the soldiers of the Eleventh Armored Division of the U.S. Third Army one day after their actual liberation in May 1945. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration.

A former major league pitcher has made the claim that the Holocaust would not have happened if Jews “had the right to bear arms” and defend themselves against Hitler.

John Rocker pitched 6 somewhat-successful years in the major leagues but is perhaps best known for racial and homophobic slurs made in 1999.

In an article on the conservative website WND.com, Rocker launched into an attack on U.S. President Barack Obama’s threat to toughen gun laws. He compared Obama to “Stalin, Mao and Hitler,” saying that he wants to “severely neuter the Second Amendment and disarm the law-abiding citizens of this nation.”

He added that disarming Americans would be to expose them to the same plight the Jews suffered in Europe during the rise of Nazism.

“Absolute certainties are a rare thing in this life, but one I think can be collectively agreed upon is the undeniable fact that the Holocaust would have never taken place had the Jewish citizenry of Hitler’s Germany had the right to bear arms and defended themselves with those arms.”

During an interview with the American magazine Sports Illustrated in 1999, Rocker was quoted as saying, in response to a question as to whether he would play in New York City: “I would retire first. It’s the most hectic, nerve-racking city. Imagine having to take the 7 train to the ballpark, looking like you’re (riding through) Beirut next to some kid with purple hair next to some queer with AIDS right next to some dude who just got out of jail for the fourth time right next to some 20-year-old mom with four kids. It’s depressing.”

He was originally suspended by the Major Leagues for 28 days, but had the suspension reduced to half. By 2003 he no longer was pitching in the Major Leagues.

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner

Algemeiner.com