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February 28, 2013 1:30 am

Jewish NYU-POLY Student Pushes Invention That Could Eliminate Gun Violence in Schools

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The question that has plagued Democrats and Republicans alike since the recent massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut is “What are we going to do about the guns?”. Six staff members and 20 children were shot and killed when a gunman opened fire on the school in December, among the victims was a six year old Jewish boy, Noah Pozner, who was shot 11 times.

Following the shooting, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg expressed his sympathy, as well as the need for a closer look at gun laws. “This is a national tragedy and it demands a national response. My deepest sympathies are with the families of all those affected, and my determination to stop this madness is stronger than ever” he said, calling for more than presidential rhetoric on tightening gun-control legislation. However, months later, the issues surrounding gun laws seem to have conveniently drifted into the background of the political stage. It remains apparent however, that change is necessary.

One promising young Jewish Brooklyn student may have the answer. Twenty-one year old Joshua Soussan, who attends NYU Polytechnical Institute, has pitched an invention proposal to the INNO/VENTION COMPETITION that promises to change the face of gun violence in the U.S.

“The design is called AEGIS. It consists of two components, a radio frequency emitter, plugged into a socket in schools and a response unit on the weapon. When the frequency is detected, it prevents the gun from firing. If you are in the proximity of a school or government building, your weapon will become disabled. It’s simple, ” Soussan explained to The Algemeiner.

Naturally, no gun in circulation at present has the immobilizer technology installed, however Soussan is confident that, similar to the enforcement of the seat belt law in 1965, the public will be open to change in the interest of public safety.

“Under President Johnson, all cars had to have a modification made to be legal to drive. Similarly, semiautomatic rifle owners who do not adhere to this new law would  have their firearm license revoked until they bring their weapons in to be altered,” said Soussan. This technology would not alter the guns functionality in any way but simply limit it to use away from schools, universities and other public venues. “If you believe that school shootings should stop then there should be no problem with enforcing the technology,” the student continued.

There have been five school shootings since the Sandy Hook massacre in Connecticut four months ago.

The only son of U.S. Army Chaplain, Major Henry Soussan, Joshua learned respect for firearms from an early age and believes that potentially dangerous devices require limitations.

The same concept exists in cars. Every car on the market is chipped to prevent the driver from driving past a certain limit. This law is not in place to infringe on our freedom but rather to prevent reckless driving and possibly fatalities. We are not saying that guns should be banned but rather disabled in certain areas. I believe that regardless off political affiliation, everyone will agree that guns never have and never will belong in our nation’s schools,” he concluded.

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