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May 9, 2013 5:55 pm

Kerry Highlights Jordan’s Role in Peace Following Israel-Jordan Tensions Over Jerusalem

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Secretary of State John Kerry. Photo: US Senate.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry highlighted Jordan’s role in regional peace following sudden tensions between Israel and Jordan over Jerusalem.

“Jordan is an essential partner to peace. It borders Israel and has already engaged in many activities regarding security, trade and relations,” Kerry said before meeting Jordanian Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh, the Jerusalem Post reported.

Kerry’s remarks come in the wake of a diplomatic dispute between Israel and Jordan over Muslim worshipers access to the Temple Mount during Jerusalem Day celebrations this week. Several Israeli police were mildly hurt when Muslim worshipers threw chairs at the officers. Israeli police has had to arrest Arab youths who were yelling at Jewish worshippers.

Reacting to the incident, Jordan’s parliament voted Wednesday to recall its ambassador to Israel. But Israeli President Shimon Peres later issued a call for calm and highlighted Israel’s commitment to maintaining access to the holy sites for all religions.

“I want to say this loud and clear—we will respect all religions’ holy places and will do everything to maintain [worshippers’] security,” Peres said.

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  • shloime

    “I want to say this loud and clear—we will respect all religions’ holy places and will do everything to maintain [worshippers’] security,” Peres said.

    presumably, that also extends to jewish worshippers.

  • JB Silver

    If Pres. Peres is really sincere, let him demand immediate access to the Temple Mount by Jews and Christians for prayer, since members of both Abrahamic religions are discriminated against by Moslems on the Temple Mount, when they try to pray there to the G-D all three religions worship.

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