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November 24, 2013 11:48 am

Iran’s FARS News Agency Uploads Nuclear Agreement Text

avatar by Joshua Levitt

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Tehran-based Fars News Agency. Photo: Screenshot / Fars.

Tehran-based Fars News Agency. Photo: Screenshot / Fars.

Iran’s semi-official state news agency, FARS, uploaded an unsigned copy of the four-page memorandum reached early on Sunday between the Islamic Republic and world powers.

“After the White House released a modified version of the deal struck by Iran and the six world powers in Geneva early Sunday morning, the Iranian Foreign Ministry released the text of the agreement,” FARS said.

The uploaded document is dated Geneva, November 23, 2013. It begins, “The goal for these negotiations is to reach a mutually-agreed long-term comprehensive solution that would ensure Iran’s nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful. Iran reaffirms that under no circumstances will Iran ever seek or develop any nuclear weapons.”

The document, a precursor to a later “comprehensive solution,” outlines the goals of a future accord: to “enable Iran to fully enjoy its right to nuclear energy for peaceful purposes under the relevant articles of the NPT” (Non-Proliferation Treaty) and ” involve a mutually defined enrichment program with practical limits and transparency measures to ensure the peaceful nature of the program.”

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The protocol for the final agreement, itself, “would constitute an integrated whole where nothing is agreed until everything is agreed,” meaning a partial agreement would be unsatisfactory. The “solution would involve a reciprocal, step-by-step process, and would produce the comprehensive lifting of all UN Security Council sanctions, as well as multilateral and national sanctions related to Iran’s nuclear program.”

As for the details on uranium enrichment, the document calls on Iran to take “(f)rom the existing uranium enriched to 20%, retain half as working stock of 20% oxide for fabrication of fuel for the TRR. Dilute the remaining 20% UF6 to no more than 5%,” and agree to “not enrich uranium over 5% for the duration of the 6 months.”

“Beginning when the line for conversion of UF6 enriched up to 5% to UO2 is ready, Iran has decided to convert to oxide UF6 newly enriched up to 5% during the 6 month period, as provided in the operational schedule of the conversion plant declared to the IAEA.”

Iran also agrees to freeze all of “its activities at the Natanz Fuel Enrichment Plant, Fordow, or the Arak reactor, designated by the IAEA as IR-40.”

The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency becomes much more enhanced, with Iran allowing access to all of its until-now locked nuclear laboratories, including those that hold the uranium-enriching centrifuges.

The carrot for all of these conditions is also extensive. The deal allows Iran access to the oil market, suspending U.S. and EU sanctions on petrochemical exports, as well as for gold and precious metals, Iran’s auto industry, parts for its civil aviation industry. It also pledges to repatriate certain funds belonging to Iran in offshore accounts, though no actual number is included in the document. Reports have said the sum totals several billion dollars.

Iran’s semi-official state news agency, FARS, uploaded an unsigned copy of the four-page memorandum reached early on Sunday between the Islamic Republic and world powers.

“The goal for these negotiations is to reach a mutually-agreed long-term comprehensive solution that would ensure Iran’s nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful,” the document begins. “Iran reaffirms that under no circumstances will Iran ever seek or develop any nuclear weapons.”

The document, clearly a precursor to a later “comprehensive solution” outlines  goals of a future accord: to “enable Iran to fully enjoy its right to nuclear energy for peaceful purposes under the relevant articles of the NPT” (Non-Proliferation Treaty) and ” involve a mutually defined enrichment program with practical limits and transparency measures to ensure the peaceful nature of the program.”

The protocol for the final agreement, itself, “would constitute an integrated whole where nothing is agreed until everything is agreed,” meaning a partial agreement would be unsatisfactory. The “solution would involve a reciprocal, step-by-step process, and would produce the comprehensive lifting of all UN Security Council sanctions, as well as multilateral and national sanctions related to Iran’s nuclear program.”

As for the details on uranium enrichment, the document calls on Iran to take “(f)rom the existing uranium enriched to 20%, retain half as working stock of 20% oxide for fabrication of fuel for the TRR. Dilute the remaining 20% UF6 to no more than 5%,” and agree to “not enrich uranium over 5% for the duration of the 6 months.”

“Beginning when the line for conversion of UF6 enriched up to 5% to UO2 is ready, Iran has decided to convert to oxide UF6 newly enriched up to 5% during the 6 month period, as provided in the operational schedule of the conversion plant declared to the IAEA.”

Iran also agrees to freeze all of “its activities at the Natanz Fuel Enrichment Plant, Fordow, or the Arak reactor, designated by the IAEA as IR-40.”

The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency becomes much more enhanced, with Iran allowing access to all of its until-now locked nuclear laboratories, including those that hold the uranium-enriching centrifuges.

The carrot for all of these conditions is also extensive. The deal allows Iran access to the oil market, suspending U.S. and EU sanctions on petrochemical exports, as well as for gold and precious metals, Iran’s auto industry, parts for its civil aviation industry, as well as repatriate certain funds belonging to Iran in offshore accounts, though no actual number is included in the document. Reports have said the sum totals several billion dollars.

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