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March 24, 2014 7:27 am

What a Shame: Terrorist Who Murdered Israeli Children Ends Hunger Strike

avatar by Elder of Ziyon

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Terror victim families the release of Palestinian terrorists with photos of their loved ones . Photo: Hillel Meir / Tazpit News Agency.

Earlier this month, trying to take advantage of the uproar after Israel killed a Palestinian Jordanian judge at the Allenby bridge, a Jordanian who murdered seven Israeli schoolgirls started a hunger strike to pressure Israel to release him. He was even refusing his medication.

Unfortunately, he has ended the strike after less than a week rather than seeing it through to the end.

A Jordanian soldier jailed for life for the murder of seven Israeli schoolgirls, who had been on a hunger strike for five days, was hospitalised Wednesday after his health deteriorated, police said.

“Ahmad Dakamseh is currently being hospitalised after his health deteriorated because he had been refusing to eat or take medicine since Friday,” a statement said.

He ended his hunger strike in hospital and is currently receiving all necessary care.”

On March 10, Israeli soldiers killed Jordanian Judge Raed Zeiter in a scuffle at the Allenby Bridge border crossing, prompting Jordanian MPs to demand that Dakamseh be freed.

But the government refused, and Dakamseh began his hunger strike.

Israel, which said Zeiter had attacked the soldiers and tried to steal one of their weapons, expressed regret over the shooting but stopped short of apologising.

In 1997, Dakamseh opened fire on a group of Israeli schoolgirls as they visited Baqura, a scenic peninsula on the Jordan River near the Israeli border.

He killed seven of the girls and wounded five more, as well as a teacher.

He was taking medicine for high blood pressure and diabetes, according to his son.

It really is a shame.

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