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December 10, 2014 4:08 pm

Rare Litter of Sumatran Tiger Cubs Born in Jerusalem’s Biblical Zoo (PHOTO)

avatar by Dave Bender

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Sumatran tiger cubs born at Jerusalem's biblical zoo. Photo: Courtesy.

Sumatran tiger cubs born at Jerusalem's biblical zoo. Photo: Courtesy.

“Hannah,” a Sumatran tiger at Jerusalem’s Biblical zoo, recently gave birth to two healthy cubs, and began taking care of them, unlike previous litters, NRG News said Wednesday.

Hannah’s mate, “Avigdor,” while nearby, was unavailable for comment on the happy occasion.

There are only some 400 of the endangered breed left in existence, and, besides captivity, are only found on the eponymous Indonesian island.

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This is Hannah’s fourth litter – in previous tries, she abandoned the cubs at birth, leaving them to be raised and cared for by zoo staff.

On January 31st, 2008, a cub rescue team managed to save one after the mother left them, and named him “Sylvester.”

He was raised by staff at the zoo, and in 2010, was sent to a zoo in France to, hopefully, continue the lineage.

“A century ago, more than 100,000 tigers from eight sub-species were distributed across an area stretching from Turkey in the west across Asia to the eastern coast of Russia,” according to the zoo.

Sumatran tigers. Photo: Tisch Family Zoological Gardens.

Sumatran tigers. Photo: Tisch Family Zoological Gardens.

“Over the last 100 years, they have lost 93 percent of their historic range and three sub-species have become extinct: the Balinese Tiger, the Caspian Tiger and the Javanese Tiger. Today, the global population is estimated to be less than 4,000 individuals.”

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