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December 24, 2014 4:28 pm

26 Years of ‘Matzo Ball’ on Christmas Eve Lead to 20 Jewish Marriages

avatar by Alina Dain Sharon / JNS.org

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Rather than watching TV re-runs and eating Chinese food, young Jews are more likely to be at the "Matzo Ball" (pictured) this Christmas Eve. Photo: Dre Bless.

JNS.org – Sitting in front of the television eating Chinese food and watching reruns of It’s A Wonderful Life isn’t exactly what young Jews are doing this Christmas Eve.

A trend that started years ago—big blowout parties with lots of time to mingle and network—has become tradition, as JNS.org reported in 2011. One of those big Christmas events for Jews is the “Matzo Ball.”

Matzo Ball is a project of the Society of Young Jewish Professionals (SYJP), the nation’s largest and most successful membership organization for Jewish professionals. More than 50,000 people  attending the Christmas Eve Jewish singles event since it was started 26 years ago.

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According to Andy Rudnick, founder of the Matzo Ball, the event offers men and women the opportunity to meet in an environment conducive to developing networking opportunities, long-lasting friendships, and romantic relationships. The high annual attendance of the event has resulted in at least 20 documented marriages, the New York Post reported.

“As a 22-year-old, I never expected to meet my husband at the Matzo Ball,” said Lauren Siegel, a 34-year-old mom of four from Merrick, N.Y. “I wasn’t fixated on getting married at that time, but I had a feeling I was going to meet someone that night.”

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