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January 2, 2015 11:27 am

Jerusalem Launches Unity Prize in Memory of Murdered Jewish Teens

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JNS.org – The city of Jerusalem announced the establishment of the “Jerusalem Unity Prize” in memory of the three Jewish teenagers who were kidnapped and murdered by Hamas last June.

The prize of up to 100,000 shekels (about $25,600) prize, which was conceived by the city in partnership with the families of the murdered boys and the Jerusalem-based organization Gesher, will be awarded in three separate categories: individuals or organizations, social initiatives, and Israel and the Diaspora. A committee including the mayor of Jerusalem, the boys’ parents, and other dignitaries will choose the winners of the prize, which will be a way “to perpetuate the spirit of unity which existed across Israel and around the world during the days following the boys’ kidnapping,” according to a press release.

“While grappling with the unknown question of the fate of their sons, the Yifrach, Shaar and Frenkel families taught the entire world a remarkable lesson in courage and showed us that unity is a value that enables us to overcome even the greatest challenges,” said Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat.

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The mothers of victims Eyal Yifrach, Gilad Shaar, and Naftali Frenkel came together for a video to mark the prize’s launch.

“For many years, Eyal talked about unity and connecting to others,” said his mother, Iris Yifrach. “The most appropriate way to pay tribute to his life is to commit ourselves to these ideals.”

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