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April 9, 2015 5:15 pm

Poll Finds 80 Percent of Jewish Israelis Believe Memory of the Holocaust Will Fade

avatar by David Daoud

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According to a recent poll, over 80 percent of Jewish Israelis believe the Holocaust will lose its historical significance

More than 80 percent of Israel’s Jewish citizens believe that, in a few years, the memory of the Holocaust could fade to become just one of many historical events in the national consciousness, according to a recent study.

Israel’s NRG news reported that the study was conducted by Geocartography for the Center of the Organizations of Holocaust Survivors ahead of Yom HaShoah, which will be commemorated next week.

Over one-third of respondents (36.6 percent) said that the memory of the Holocaust would fade, and 45 percent responded that there was a possibility that it could happen. Only 17.5 percent said that such an outcome would not occur.

Significantly, adults found it harder than young people to believe that the memory of the Holocaust would lose its centrality and significance with the course of time. 30 percent of those aged fifty-five and up said that it would not, compared with only 17.4 percent of those aged 35-54 and 11.5 percent of those aged 18-34.

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Education also seemed to play a role in the respondents’ opinions. Those whose highest level of education was a high school degree (19.8 percent), and those with below-average income (21.1 percent), found it hard to believe that the memory of the Holocaust would weaken. By comparison, those with an academic-level education and above-average income were more likely to agree that the Holocaust would lose its significance with time, with 14.3 percent and 12.7 percent agreeing, respectively.

Almost half of those surveyed said that the memory of the Holocaust affects Israelis on a personal level and the Jewish state on a national level when it comes to decision-making, according to NRG.

The survey was conducted among a representative sample of 500 people from the adult Jewish population in Israel. Its aim was to investigate whether the public’s memory of the Holocaust still influences daily decision-making, and the possibility of the Holocaust becoming one of many vague historical events, considering the fact that very few Holocaust survivors remain alive.

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  • Wayne B

    Well look how quickly the Rwandan massacre has been forgotten. Or the killing fields of Cambodia (Kampuchea), or the largest modern ethnic cleansing of a region just at the end and after WW2 committed by the Russians. Or the war crimes of the UK and US soldiers both past and present. Libyan invasion. 2nd Iraq war.

    On and on it goes. Oh and what of the occupied territories. I just watch a series of photos showing a 5 year old boy being chased down by an IDF truck and sprayed with skunk water. Really skunk water making people smell like feces for weeks.

    Anyway, it seems regardless of race, religion, culture, or ethnicity, humans commit atrocities upon others. In that we are all equal n’est pas?

  • I predict 50 years from the time of the last survivor

  • Finally, how do we keep Holocaust memory alive and what is our message to our children, grandchildren and future generations? In my opinion, all the museums in the world and all the books that are written will not preserve the memory of the Holocaust. In time, the Holocaust may become nothing more than a date in history. If we teach Holocaust and genocide together as one subject, we guarantee that the impact of the Holocaust will merely blend into other genocides. What is the solution? We must incorporate in our religious services and religious traditions, memoirs, readings, and liturgy, readings concerning the Holocaust. I have, therefore, already written a Holocaust Passover Haggadah and a Holocaust Siddur ( see on the internet: RosenbergHolocaustHaggadah.com). Reading about the Holocaust must become part of every Jewish holiday, particularly the High Holidays. I want to emphasize to those children and grandchildren who still have living survivors of the Holocaust in their families, ask questions now, don’t be afraid. Sometimes, a Holocaust survivor will not feel comfortable speaking to their children, but will be able to communicate their thoughts with their grandchildren. I ask that you do so before all the Holocaust survivors are gone.

    Remember the lives, the culture, the achievements, of those who perished in the Holocaust

    I made one promise to my parents of blessed memory, and that is that one day, I would fill up a station wagon with my children. Thank God, I have a lovely wife, Charlene, four children, and so far, seven grandchildren. If you wish to remember the Shoah and the beauty of Judaism which existed before that horrible period in our history, I say to you, have children, name them after Holocaust survivors as I have done, and never forget who we are as a people.

    .

    Finally, how do we keep Holocaust memory alive and what is our message to our children, grandchildren and future generations? In my opinion, all the museums in the world and all the books that are written will not preserve the memory of the Holocaust. In time, the Holocaust may become nothing more than a date in history. If we teach Holocaust and genocide together as one subject, we guarantee that the impact of the Holocaust will merely blend into other genocides. What is the solution? We must incorporate in our religious services and religious traditions, memoirs, readings, and liturgy, readings concerning the Holocaust. I have, therefore, already written a Holocaust Passover Haggadah and a Holocaust Siddur ( see on the internet: RosenbergHolocaustHaggadah.com). Reading about the Holocaust must become part of every Jewish holiday, particularly the High Holidays. I want to emphasize to those children and grandchildren who still have living survivors of the Holocaust in their families, ask questions now, don’t be afraid. Sometimes, a Holocaust survivor will not feel comfortable speaking to their children, but will be able to communicate their thoughts with their grandchildren. I ask that you do so before all the Holocaust survivors are gone.

    Remember the lives, the culture, the achievements, of those who perished in the Holocaust

    I made one promise to my parents of blessed memory, and that is that one day, I would fill up a station wagon with my children. Thank God, I have a lovely wife, Charlene, four children, and so far, seven grandchildren. If you wish to remember the Shoah and the beauty of Judaism which existed before that horrible period in our history, I say to you, have children, name them after Holocaust survivors as I have done, and never forget who we are as a people.

  • mjazz

    Where I live there is a billboard which marks the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide.

  • Benjamin Abrahams

    Those who believe “the Holocaust” will eventually just be mentioned in the margin of the history books, like the French fascist le Penn says, are most likely those who flaunt the Jewish traditions like lighting the Sabbath candles, fasting on Yom Kippur and eating matzoth on Pesach, just to mention a few of the most unpopular traditions amongst the “historic Jews”, and contrary to what the “traditional Jews” know to have made the Jews survive and prosper throughout history, and they will fade earlier than the memories of how that Holocaust was an important brick in the wall for building Israel and Jewishness all over the world.

  • Mickey Oberman

    I wonder if they have not heard of the Egyptian Exodus, Greek Hanukah, Roman Masada, the Spanish Inquisition, and the other too numerous tragic events in Jewish history. None of those survivors ‘remain alive’.

    The present daily fight for survival has without doubt been strongly influenced by our past and will continue without end.

  • TheAZCowBoy

    Maybe there would be more living Holocaust survivors if the low life ZioNazi atheist thieves hadn’t stolen billions of the survivots Holocaust reparations funds with lies and fraudulent submissions.

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