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May 13, 2015 2:55 pm

New Organization Monitors Campus Radicals to Expose Them to Future Employers (VIDEO)

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The organizations featured in Canary Mission's database on its website include Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) and the Muslim Brotherhood. Photo: Screenshot.

A new organization was launched on Tuesday to track organizers of anti-Israel movements on U.S. college campuses and alert the public, as well as future employers, about their involvement with the hate groups, The Algemeiner has learned.

Canary Mission was founded by students and citizens concerned by the growing number of campus movements that work to demonize and boycott Israel, harass Jewish and pro-Israel students, and spread radical, antisemitic ideas.

In a statement issued on its website, Canary Mission’s anonymous founders said the public has the right to know who is a part of this “dangerous campaign” of “ugly antisemitism and anti-Americanism that drives the anti-Israel movement on campuses across the United States.”

“So do the future employers of those who immerse themselves in antisemitic activity as college students,” the statement continued. “We are determined to expose the statements, activities, and unsavory affiliations of all of those responsible for spreading this hate on our campuses.”

Launched in New York City, Canary Mission has created a database of students, professors, organizations and off-campus agitators who are actively involved in college campus antisemitism and the anti-Israel Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement around the U.S. The detailed database provides descriptions, links, photos and videos for each activist listed. Its website also allows the public to submit details about someone involved in antisemitic or anti-Israel activities. Once the details are verified, the organization will publish a page about the person or group.

“By holding people accountable for actions they would rather leave buried in their past, the organization seeks to serve as a deterrent for others contemplating involvement in these threatening movements,” Canary Mission said.

Members of the organization explained, “It is our duty to try and contain this tidal wave of hatred, and ultimately turn back the tide to make the campuses across North America welcoming and open for Jews and Israel- supporters once again. We call on our fellow Americans to work with us, ensuring that today’s hate mongers on campus are not employees in your workplaces tomorrow.”

The database includes campus groups such as the Muslim Students Association (MSA), which was established by members of the Muslim Brotherhood. In an entry on its site, Canary Mission says the MSA has ties with a number of radical groups and notorious terrorist organizations, like Hamas. It points out that a FBI investigation in 2004 revealed an internal Muslim Brotherhood document in which a brotherhood leader called the MSA “one of our organizations.”

Among the individuals featured in the database is Taher Herzallah, a student who uploaded photos of wounded Israelis on his Facebook page and described them as “the most beautiful site (sic) in my eyes.” He currently works to organize BDS activity on campuses in the Western U.S., according to Canary Mission.

Another featured student is Tina Matar from University of California, Riverside. Matar is president in her university’s chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) and is also teaching a university course entitled, “Palestine & Israel: Settler-Colonialism and Apartheid,” which is sponsored by anti-Israel English professor David Lloyd. Matar was also one of the authors and proponents of the Israel divestment bill she helped pass last year at UC Riverside, though it was later overturned.

Watch a promotional video about Canary Mission below:

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