Thursday, September 21st | 1 Tishri 5778

Close

Be in the know!

Get our exclusive daily news briefing.

Subscribe
July 20, 2015 3:12 pm

Jewish Institutions in Germany Still Need Police Protection, Leader Says

avatar by Shiryn Solny

Email a copy of "Jewish Institutions in Germany Still Need Police Protection, Leader Says" to a friend
A German Jewish leader said Jewish institutions in Germany need police protection. Photo: Enough is Enough Facebook page.

A German Jewish leader said Jewish institutions in Germany need police protection. Photo: Enough is Enough Facebook page.

Jewish institutions in Germany “still need police protection” due to antisemitic threats, especially amid an expanding Jewish population in the country, President of the Central Council of Jews in Germany Josef Schuster told Deutsche Welle on Sunday.

“There is a potential threat,” he continued. “My biggest wish would be that this police protection would someday no longer be necessary.”

Approximately 250,000 Jews live in Germany and half are members of one of the 108 congregations spread across the country, according to the report. Germany is the only country in Europe to report a growing Jewish population.

The Central Council of Jews, founded 65 years ago, is an “umbrella organization” for all Jewish communities in Germany, explained Schuster, who has headed the organization since October 2014.

Related coverage

September 19, 2016 3:40 pm
36

BBC Journalist Mistakenly Taken for Jewish Taunted by British Intellectual Commanding She ‘Get Back in the Oven’

A BBC journalist mistakenly identified as a Jew was told at a recent high-end London event to “get back in...

Schuster said he believes the nature of antisemitism has evolved over the years. The hatred is no longer just the domain of political extremists, but also those “in the middle of society,” he said,  adding that nowadays antisemitism is often disguised as anti-Zionism.

“Today, many are willing to say what they may already have long thought, but had not dared to utter,” he said.

According to Schuster, the only way to combat antisemitism is through education. He noted that it is most important to start with younger generations and teach them about Jewish communities and Judaism so that it is not perceived as something alien.

“No child or young person in Germany or anywhere else in the world is born an antisemite or racist,” he said.

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner
  • Robert Weintraub

    Why are Jews still living there?

Algemeiner.com