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July 30, 2015 5:41 pm

Munich Maintains Ban on Sidewalk Holocaust Memorials

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Stolperstein for Max and Olga Mayer in Heidelberg, Germany.

Stolperstein for Max and Olga Mayer in Heidelberg, Germany.

With backing from the local Jewish community, the city council of Munich voted to uphold a ban on the cobblestone-shaped plaques commemorating Holocaust victims, The Local reported on Wednesday.

The decision came after about 100,000 people in the city had signed a petition calling for the lifting of the ban of these “stolpersteine,” or “stumbling blocks,” designed by German artist Gunter Demnig in 1996.

Instead, the city will allow these small commemorations to Holocaust victims on the walls of the houses where the victims once lived, according to the report.

A key opponent of lifting the ban on stolpersteine was Munich Jewish Community President Charlotte Knopbloch, herself a survivor of World War II. She said the engraved plaques disrespected the memories of the dead because every time somebody stepped on them they became defiled.

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In January, she told AFP: “People murdered in the Holocaust deserve better than a plaque in the dust, street dirt and even worse filth.”

The decision on Wednesday was apparently a compromise between opponents of lifting the ban, like Knopbloch, and supporters, including Munich Mayor Dieter Reiter and a city cultural adviser, who believed the plaques should have been incorporated into a “network of cultural remembrance.”

 

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  • Gabriella Meros

    Its not only Charlotte Knobloch, here are many Jews and non Jews ago are against THE Stolpersteine. Most of the people walk over the Stones this is Reality in daily life and a lot of Stones are destroyed and Stolen by Nazis. Because Nazis love this Stones because they are Server on the ground and they can Esslingen be festrostest. The Stolperstein groups are very controversial Sinne the beginning. Mr Demnig who cremtest the Stones earns Mill of € With them and ignores the critics. A lot of People like to do something good, this project got populär and like a Monopol but a lot of People didnt Understand that this stores hurt a lot of People not only Shoah Survivers. There are Projekts with Respekt like Memory Tablets in Eye sight not
    on the floor where everybody can step on the names. We are very Tankfüllung that we have this Stones not in Munich and looking fortwarf that Projekts with Respekt for the Victtims of THE Shoah will be smsen and we are defenately against this Stones at the ground Even the Short Text remember a KZ number. And besides there are Istaelhaters in this Stolperstein groups and a lot of Family members were not asked if they like Stones a lot of Irritations Backstage besides Respekt is not in the floor. Sorry typed by Iphone.

  • Vittorio

    I’m with Charlotte Knopbloch. Many will purposefully step on the stones. This is not a Jewish way to remember the victims of the Holocaust.

  • Edith Gould

    I disagree The stumbling blocks are a greater memorial than plagues on walls,

  • Count LF Chodkiewicz Chudzikiewicz

    As the nearest practicing Jewish relative of Holocaust victims who has investments in Germany and funds stolpersteins for my martyred cousins, Aunt and Uncles, I met Charlotte Knopbloch, a professional yetta with no feeling for the history of German Jewry, a left wing statist political view at variance with historical German Jewish thought, at a meeting she managed to bore with a pointless speech in honor of the 125th Anniversary of the establishment of the Jewish Community of Chemnitz my greatgrandfather Samuel Rosenthal, a US citizen, helped found. She managed to spend her time playing left wing political games and ignoring the occasion we were gathered for. She is the J Street of Germany, the Peter Bienart of German Jewry. A nutjob!

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