Sunday, October 22nd | 2 Heshvan 5778

Close

Be in the know!

Get our exclusive daily news briefing.

Subscribe
August 7, 2015 7:16 am

Rand Paul Defends Position on Cutting Off Aid to Israel

avatar by News Editor

Email a copy of "Rand Paul Defends Position on Cutting Off Aid to Israel" to a friend
Sen. Rand Paul. Photo: U.S. Senate.

Sen. Rand Paul. Photo: U.S. Senate.

Cleveland Jewish News – Israel stood on the sideline for most of the Aug. 6 primetime Republican Presidential Primary Debate at Quicken Loans Arena in downtown Cleveland.

That changed an hour and 43 minutes in when Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul was asked about his previous proposal to cut all financial aid to Israel.

Read full story.

 

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner
  • dante

    using Rand Paul’s formula, FDR would have let Britain and the USSR fall to the germans and their allies. if we would have waited for economic recovery and budget surpluses, there would have been nothing left of europe: german barbarism would have controlled the entire continent.

    unlike, obama, Rand Paul is a well-intentioned man but he is wrong about this very consequential issue.

  • shloime

    there is no such thing as “aid” without strings attached.

    paul is absolutely wrong, because foreign aid helps mostly the us. yes, it is sent to israel, but most of it has to be spent in the united states, amounting to a $3 billion subsidy to american arms contractors, providing well-paid american jobs, and paying both corporate and personal taxes. and it also has the benefit of eliminating the home market of a potential competitor in the arms export business, guaranteeing even more business for america. and all this for less than 2 days’ worth of the “war on terror”.

    from israel’s point of view, american aid is not a crucial part of the budget, gives washington a veto over idf operations, and makes it difficult to develop a local supply chain, so long as uncle sam is footing the bill. once the economic spinoffs are factored in, israel could forgo the american foreign aid, at a cost of less than $2 billion (israeli suppliers are cheaper), and make up the rest in employment and increased tax revenues (and exports). and be free of the need to clear military operations with washington.

    so whose side is mr paul on, after all?

Algemeiner.com