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September 3, 2015 9:59 am

Key Iranian Negotiator: Uranium Enrichment Will Not Cease, Even for a Single Day

avatar by David Daoud

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Iranian Foreign Ministry official Abbas Aragchi. The key negotiator over the nuclear deal with the P5+1 says uranium enrichment will continue. Photo: Wikipedia.

Iranian Foreign Ministry official Abbas Aragchi. The key negotiator over the nuclear deal with the P5+1 says uranium enrichment will continue. Photo: Wikipedia.

An Iranian Foreign Ministry official, who was among the Islamic Republic’s chief negotiators with the P5+1, said his country’s uranium enrichment would not stop, even for a single day, Hezbollah-affiliated TV network Al-Manar reported on Wednesday.

Abbas Aragchi, the Iranian Foreign Ministry’s Deputy for Legal and International Affairs,said that Iran was capable, withing the next 15 years, “of reaching 190,000 enrichment units with our sixth and eighth central centrifuge units.”

Aragchi purportedly made his comments in an address to Iran’s Assembly of Experts, during which he also referred to the Joint Comprehensive Plant of Action (JCPOA), asserting that the nuclear deal did not cross any of Iran’s red lines, and emphasizing that the negotiating team had succeeded in lifting economic sanctions — both elements of utmost importance to Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei.

He pointed out that the current restrictions on Iran’s military purchases and exports, as well as on its ballistic missiles program, would also be lifted gradually.

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Aragchi told the Assembly that while Iran had accepted some restrictions on its nuclear program, these would not remain in place indefinitely. Nor would they lead to the cessation of Iran’s nuclear industry or program.

 

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