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January 3, 2016 7:58 am

British-Jewish Trucker, Volunteer Policeman Wins Award for Uplifting Twitter Posts

avatar by Shiryn Solny

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Jewish trucker Moshe Rothstein, pictured, became a special constable for the Greater Manchester Police four years ago. Photo: Twitter.

Jewish trucker Moshe Rothstein, who became a special constable for the Greater Manchester Police four years ago. Photo: Twitter.

A Jewish trucker and volunteer policeman in the UK won an award for his Twitter posts, the Manchester Evening News reported on Friday.

Moshe Rothstein, 31, was a joint winner of the special constable category in the national awards for police tweeters. The Orthodox Jew said his Twitter account, @TruckerMozzi, which has a bit more than 1,400 followers, helped a woman cope with the aftermath of a breakup from her husband, and prevented another woman from committing suicide by jumping off a bridge.

“I literally pulled her back,” Rothstein said.

The Salford resident — known to fellow truckers as Mozzi — drives about 100,000 miles each year, shipping crates across Britain, the Manchester Evening News reported. In his free time, he volunteers for the Greater Manchester Police as a special constable and helps police officers in Bury. He said he “absolutely loves” it.

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In one inspiring tweet, Rothstein wrote, “If you fail, never give up because F.A.I.L. means First Attempt In Learning.” The UK native, who became a special constable four years ago, said although he is shocked he won an award for his Twitter posts, he knows his messages have an impact on people’s lives.

“It’s fantastic to be able to get messages out there really quickly,” he added. “People see I am a police officer and they tell me all their issues. I give them support as best I can. There’s so much bad media about the police, I think it’s good to put out something positive.”

Rothstein decided to volunteer for the Manchester police after becoming a victim of antisemitism and got to know the local police officers. He said at times he would call police and no one was available to come to his aid because they were short-staffed. When police first suggested he become a special constable, Rothstein laughed at the idea.

“I said, ‘Are you having a laugh?’ But it all went from there,” he recounted. “I did my training and they were all so welcoming.”

In September, Rothstein was given an award in London for his work in building relations between police and the Jewish community, according to the Manchester Evening News.

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