Monday, December 11th | 23 Kislev 5778

Close

Be in the know!

Get our exclusive daily news briefing.

Subscribe
March 25, 2016 10:23 am

Argentina’s Jewish Leaders Ask for Israel’s Help in Face of Accelerated Assimilation

avatar by JNS.org

Email a copy of "Argentina’s Jewish Leaders Ask for Israel’s Help in Face of Accelerated Assimilation" to a friend
Sinagoga de la Congregación Israelita Argentina, a synagogue in Buenos Aires. Credit: GameOfLight via Wikimedia Commons.

Sinagoga de la Congregación Israelita Argentina, a synagogue in Buenos Aires. Credit: GameOfLight via Wikimedia Commons.

JNS.org – Leaders of Argentina’s Jewish community have warned that accelerated assimilation by Jews in the South American nation and worldwide is “placing the Jewish people’s future at risk.” The phenomenon, they said, is akin to “quiet terrorism.”

Buenos Aires is home to one of the largest Jewish communities in the world, numbering nearly 300,000 people. Recent data, however, suggests that more 50 percent of young Jews in the country lose touch with their heritage. Community officials said the issue transcends the “classic assimilation” of mixed marriages, and that it seems young Jews increasingly choose to shun their religion and even distance themselves from the State of Israel.

In a letter sent to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu this week, Argentine Sephardic Rabbi Isaac Saka wrote, “This painful situation will lead to future generations, millions of Jews, who will be oblivious to their Jewish identity, and have no affiliation with the State of Israel. Millions of others might know they are Jewish, but they will lack any understanding of their heritage.”

Saka urged Netanyahu to form a special forum comprising the heads of Jewish communities and organizations worldwide to prevent accelerated assimilation, and suggested an international summit “to discuss this urgent, important, and dramatic issue’s implications on the Jewish people’s future.”

(Exclusive from Israel Hayom.)

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner
  • Julian Clovelley

    Or is it more a case of people coming to their senses and recognising that Jewishness is religious rather than genetic – that everyone from Europe and surrounding territory is traceable to Middle Eastern ancestors

    Every Christian is likely to carry Jewish ancestry simply because the first Christians were Jewish and the religion largely spread through intermarriage

    So you think you’re different? – I don’t and it would seem that in Argentina a fantasy of origins is slipping away. My own spouse has nineteenth century Jewish forebears. Let it be – let people grow together. The sooner we are all the colour of a nice suntan the better

    My son with his distant Jewish background has a Chinese girlfriend. Assimilation is the best hope for the world. Religious opposition to it is racist nonsense

  • Dani

    Excellent initiative. Congratulations to Rabbi Saca for being a leader with vission. He has worked for years helping young Jews to to get together in a Jewish environment. However, leaders requesting support need also to set the example. Here I suggest two options: weddings free of charge or very affordable for young Jewish couples at the Aron Angel Synagogue on Camargo St. And twition-free access of poor Jewish kids to the Bereshit Day School on gurruchaga st.

  • “it seems young Jews increasingly choose to shun their religion” — sounds like Israel.

    Identity is meaningless. Heritage is ancient history. What they need is to be shown the real Judaism, not only an active faith but also a way of life affecting every aspect of one’s being. Where are the Jewish leaders, the role models?

Algemeiner.com