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June 21, 2016 1:23 pm

Story of Druze Proprietor of Eatery Hit Hard in Wake of Bloody Tel Aviv Terrorist Attack Goes Viral

avatar by Ruthie Blum

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Zawa, the Druze proprietor of the Sarona Market eatery whom an Israel Radio editor encountered and wrote about. Photo: Facebook/Sharon Idan.

Zawa, the Druze proprietor of the Sarona Market eatery whom an Israel Radio editor encountered and wrote about. Photo: Facebook/Sharon Idan.

A social media post about a Druze woman whose eatery in Tel Aviv’s Sarona Market has been virtually empty since the Palestinian terrorist attack on the upscale mall earlier this month has gone viral, Israel’s Channel 10 reported on Tuesday.

The post was written by Sharon Idan, an editor at Israel Radio, who went to the restaurant-packed area to get something to eat, and encountered the suffering establishment and its proprietor.

The post reads:

I just hopped over to the Sarona Market to grab a bite before broadcasting the news at 11, and lo and behold, at the stand of a Druze woman named Zaweh, all the many pots and pans are completely full.

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True, I had planned on buying burekas, but seeing those pots with the aroma of cooking, and this woman, my grandmother’s age, standing in front of them at 10:00 pm, broke my heart.

Since the terrorist attack, she tells me, there are no customers at all.

“Maybe you can say something about this on the news,” she said.

“I can’t say something about it on the news,” I answered. “But I can write about it on Facebook, and I am sure that many people will share it.”

Zaweh tells me that only a couple of people have bought some of the stuffed cabbage that her three daughters spent eight hours preparing.

The same goes for the okra in olive oil, tomatoes and garlic. Or the freekeh – smoked green durum wheat.

So I did buy food from her, with all the money I had with me. And when she heard how much my family loves this food, she gave me – in addition to everything I bought – another three containers of stuffed cabbage as a gift.

My protestations didn’t help, and believe me, I tried. [But she said]: “Your children should only enjoy, and the most important thing is that the food is healthy. My sister, daughters and I prepare everything ourselves. Everything is fresh, with no preservatives. Whatever my grandchildren eat is what your children will eat – a gift from us from Dalya [short for Daliyat el-Carmel, a Druze town in the Haifa district].”

So if you’re in the [Sarona] area and want some home-cooked Druze food, step in.

It really is a mitzvah [good deed].

And the food – is truly indescribable. Heavenly. The Land of Milk and Honey.

Idan wrote this post on Saturday night. Since then, it has garnered 3,600 “likes” and has been shared more than 1,800 times.

According to Channel 10, the general manager of the Sarona Market, Shlomi Hajaj, said that the terrorist attack, which took place on June 8, has caused a drastic reduction in business at the complex; some of the shop- and restaurant-owners report a 50 percent loss in income. In a campaign to turn this trend around — and as schools are letting out for summer vacation — Sarona is offering a 25% discount on all consumer goods at the mall.

As The Algemeiner reported, four Israelis – two men and two women — were killed and several others wounded in a multiple shooting attack committed by two Palestinian men from the village of Yatta near Hebron. Among the victims was renowned Ben-Gurion University professor Michael Feige.

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  • So, have her sales improved?

  • Unfortunately but this is the price of Violence and terrorism as only time can heal wounds and bad memories!!!

  • HaDaR

    For non Jews to buy her food is certainly a good deed, but to say that it is “mitzvah”, that is an obligation for Jews, it is FALSE and MISLEADING: the food is NOT KOSHER, since it was cooked by non Jews in non kosher pots: the Druze, as is their custom and allowed by their religious rules, mix meat and milk in their traditional food. For Jews it is forbidden and way worse than eating pork.

  • HaDaR

    For non Jews to buy her food is certainly a good deed, but to say that it is a
    mitzvah”, that is an obligation for Jews, it is FALSE and MISLEADING: the food is NOT KOSHER, since it was cooked by non Jews in non kosher pots: Druze, as is their right, mix meat and milk in their traditional food.

  • no matter how courageous israelis are, it takes time for the bloody memories to fade… unlike gay bars the clients of sarona have lots of other choices for relaxing in…

  • This attack on the Sarona market is another example of Muslim Terrorists not only killing innocent people, they also harm their own religionist. As per this story. There are many Muslim store owners in this market. Many people are staying away because of the Terrorist. It is a shanda.

  • Why do you use the German / European “Sarona” instead of the Hebrew, authentic “Sharona”?
    We don’t call Yerushalayim “Aelia Capitolina.”
    Non-Jewish nomenclature is not obligatory for Jews.

  • Why do you use the German / European “Sarona” instead of the Hebrew, authentic “Sharona”?
    We don’t call Yerushalayim “Aelia Capitolina.
    Non-Jewish nomenclature is not obligatory for Jews.

  • Jay Lavine

    The term “go viral” is an offensive one because it refers to an organism that causes suffering, although, in that respect, I suppose it’s appropriate for social media, which create a lot more harm than good in the world.

    If this Druze restaurant could supply some of its dishes wholesale to large stores, to be sold as “to go” prepared items, it would greatly help it weather this crisis. Is there anyone who could help them out in this way by facilitating such arrangements? It’s a mitzvah to help those in need, especially by helping them make a living, and, of course, “mitzvah” really means “commandment,” not “good deed.”

  • Please convey to this woman and any others that people as far as Hollywood, California are praying for her and feeling sorrow over her undeserved suffering!

  • See what happens with a little understanding

  • Leon Fonfa

    A mitzvah to eat non-kosher food?

Algemeiner.com