Sunday, September 23rd | 14 Tishri 5779

Subscribe
September 21, 2016 6:40 am

US Embassy Sends Rosh Hashanah Gifts to Anti-Israel Groups

avatar by Elder of Ziyon

Email a copy of "US Embassy Sends Rosh Hashanah Gifts to Anti-Israel Groups" to a friend
The US Embassy in Tel Aviv. Photo: Wiki Commons.

The US Embassy in Tel Aviv. Photo: Wiki Commons.

The anti-Israel outlet +972 is upset:

Human rights organizations in Israel were in for a surprise on Monday when they opened Rosh Hashanah gift baskets sent by the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv. Among the various goodies delivered in honor of the upcoming Jewish New Year — such as chocolates and honey — was a bottle of wine produced in the occupied West Bank.

A broad range of organizations including Peace Now, B’Tselem, and Yesh Din, Gisha which focus on Palestinian rights and settlement expansion in the occupied territories, were among those to receive the gift basket.

The wine, a Cabernet Sauvignon named “Dolev” is produced by the Zion Winery located in the West Bank settlement Mishor Adumim.

In other news, the US Embassy in Tel Aviv sends gift baskets to organizations that do everything they can to undermine the Israeli government.

Does the US Embassy also send baskets of gifts to Regavim, or Im Tirtzu, or others fighting for the human rights of Jews to live where they want?

If not, it shows that despite arms sales, official US policy is to oppose the democratically elected government of Israel.

If the US sends holiday gift baskets to NGOs that oppose government policies in any other nation, especially democratic allies, I would love to hear about it.

This is a bigger story than accidentally sending out wine that was harvested in Judea and Samaria. As if that is a crime.

The opinions presented by Algemeiner bloggers are solely theirs and do not represent those of The Algemeiner, its publishers or editors. If you would like to share your views with a blog post on The Algemeiner, please be in touch through our Contact page.

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner

Algemeiner.com