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October 19, 2018 10:02 am

In 2040, Israeli Lifespan Expected to be the World’s Seventh Highest

avatar by JNS.org

A food market in Tel Aviv, Israel. Photo: Dr. Avishai Teicher vis Wikimedia Commons.

JNS.org – Israelis will enjoy the seventh-highest life-expectancy rate in the world by 2040, according to a University of Washington study published in The Lancet.

Though Israel currently occupies the 13th-place spot at a life expectancy of 82.1 years, Israel is projected to rise to seventh place at 84.4 years.

The world average of 73.8 years in 2016 is expected to rise to 77.7 by 2040.

The country with the longest longevity in 2016, Japan, will be replaced by Spain, which is currently in fourth place and projected to enjoy an average life expectancy of 85.8 years in 2040. It will be followed by Singapore (85.4 years), Switzerland (85.2 years), Portugal and Italy (84.5 years), Israel (84.4 years), France (84.2 years), and Australia and Luxembourg (84.1 years). The United States, which is currently at 43rd place, is expected to plummet to 64th place (79.8 years).

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The Palestinian life expectancy is also expected to rise, but dropped in the rankings—from 114th place and 71.9 years in 2016 to 152nd place and 72.2 years in 2040.

After Spain and Japan, the countries with the greatest longevity in 2040 are projected to be Singapore (85.4 years), Switzerland (85.2 years), Portugal and Italy (84.5 years), Israel (84.4 years), France (84.2 years), and Australia and Luxembourg (84.1 years).

The bottom 30 countries in 2040, with lifespans between 57 and 69 years, are all in sub-Saharan Africa or Pacific island states, except for Afghanistan.

The top five determinants of average life span are all lifestyle-related: blood sugar, weight, blood pressure, tobacco use and alcohol consumption.

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