Tuesday, May 11th | 29 Iyyar 5781

Subscribe
April 28, 2021 9:31 am

Vienna Communal Report: Antisemitic Incidents in Austria Hit Record in 2020

avatar by JNS.org

A street corner in Vienna, Austria. Photo: Reuters / Leonhard Foeger.

JNS.org – The number of antisemitic incidents in Austria last year reached the highest level since the Jewish community began its official records 19 years ago, according to a report published on Monday and cited by Reuters.

The number of incidents increased by 6.4 percent in 2020 to 585, as stated in an annual study by the Antisemitism Reporting Office of the Jewish Community of Vienna, the official body that represents Austria’s Jews.

Abusive behavior, including online abuse, was responsible for 62 percent of incidents with physical attacks accounting for 11 incidents, up from six in 2019. The only category that did not increase was regarding property damage.

When dividing all incidents by associated ideology, the largest category was right-wing (229 incidents), followed by “not possible to assign” (195 incidents).

Related coverage

May 10, 2021 3:12 pm
0

Leading US Jewish Groups Condemn Renewed Palestinian Violence Against Israel

Leading American Jewish groups have strongly denounced renewed Palestinian incitement and violence against Israel, amid clashes in eastern Jerusalem between...

The two months that saw the most antisemitic incidents were November—the same month the office launched a public-awareness campaign—and December, which was marked by unrest associated with an increase in coronavirus restrictions.

“The protests against the government’s coronavirus measures also left their mark, leading to a strong increase in antisemitic incidents,” according to the report, which added that those occurrences mainly involved Holocaust relativization and the spreading of antisemitic conspiracy theories. In total, 42 incidents were related to the coronavirus.

The report noted that some protesters wore yellow Stars of David, like the ones Jews were forced to wear by the Nazis, as a way of suggesting that citizens who opposed coronavirus restrictions were being persecuted like Jews during the Holocaust.

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner

Algemeiner.com

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.