The Risk of High Cholesterol Among Young Ashkenazi Jews

July 26, 2012 2:40 pm 4 comments

A doctor uses a stethoscope to examine a young girl's heart and lungs. Photo: wiki commons.

Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common genetic condition that can cause dangerously high levels of cholesterol to accumulate in the blood, increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke and heart attack at an early age. Among Ashkenazi Jews around the world, the incidence of FH is 2-5 times higher than in the general population. But despite this finding, FH remains widely unknown and is often undiagnosed among Ashkenazi Jews until a serious event such as a heart attack or stroke occurs.

The community of Ashkenazi Jews was founded when a group of settlers in 14th Century Europe moved east to escape challenges ranging from the Crusades to the bubonic plague.  To survive, Ashkenazi Jews in areas of Poland and Lithuania created tight-knit communities of mutual support and cooperation.

When a new community is established by a small group of families who live in close proximity for several generations, there is the chance that certain genetic traits can remain prevalent as they pass from one generation to the next.   Known as the “Founder Effect,” this occurrence can increase the likelihood that members of a community will share certain physical characteristics or a risk of developing certain diseases. For Ashkenazi Jews, the Founder Effect was responsible for the increased incidence of Tay-Sachs and Gaucher disease, both of which are fairly well known. It was also responsible for the increased risk of FH among Ashkenazi Jews, which remains widely undiagnosed and relatively unknown.

Understanding FH

FH is agenetic disorder that can be passed on to children by either one or both parents. Itis one of the most common inherited metabolic diseases in the world, found in about 1 in every 500 people.   FH is caused by genetic mutations that lead to abnormalities on the surface of liver cells responsible for clearing LDL(bad cholesterol) particles from the blood. As a result, cholesterol accumulates in the bloodstream beginning at an early age. All first-degree relatives of someone with FH have a 50 percent chance of inheriting the disorder.   As a result, FH families can have striking patterns of very high cholesterol levels and heart disease, heart attack or stroke early in adulthood. Early heart disease is defined as heart disease that occurs before age 65 in women and age 55 in men. In many cases, untreated people with FH who are in their 40s have arteries that are more like someone in their 80s. In addition to Ashkenazi Jews, FH is more prevalent among certain populations of people of French Canadian, Christian Lebanese andSouth African Afrikaner descent.

Only about 20 percent of people with FH have had a proper genetic diagnosis. One challenge in identifying FH is the fact that people can appear healthy and show no symptoms until they develop vascular disease that leads to a heart attack or stroke. In addition, high cholesterol is often considered to be a problem that affects people who are older or who have risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes or obesity. Children and young adults are rarely screened for high cholesterol.

If FH is diagnosed early, the associated vascular problems can often be properly treated and monitored, helping to delay or prevent serious events including heart attack and stroke. Many FH patients can manage their condition with cardiac medications and changes in diet and exercise. However, children who inherit the trait from both parents, and even some who inherit it from only one parent, can develop a severe form of FH that leads to cholesterol levels 2-4 times above the target level even with lifestyle changes and treatment with the maximum doses of cholesterol lowering medicines.

All families, and especially those at high risk of carrying the trait for FH, should develop a family tree to identify family members who had high cholesterol, heart attack or stroke at an early age. When one person in a family is diagnosed with FH, doctors will often suggest that parents, siblings, and children also be screened. The latest guidelines from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend that children in families with a pattern of early heart attacks or heart disease have their cholesterol screened between the ages of 2 and 8.

FH in Ashkenazi Jews

In the late 1980s researchers at Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem led an effort to identify the trait that is associated with FH in Ashkenazi Jews, and found a genetic mutation called G197del LDLR that may have been prevalent in the Jewish settler communities of the 14th Century.

The research showed that G197del LDLR is now prevalent among populations of Ashkenazi Jews in many locations around the world, including families in the United States, South Africa, the United Kingdom, Germany and Russia. A decade of exhaustive historical and medical research unveiled a prevalence of G197del LDLR well-beyond the initial discovery, showing that it was particularly common in South Africa and Israel. Researchers were able to piece together clues through a process called linkage disequilibrium analysis, and worked backwards to develop a timeline mapping the migration of the gene mutation.

Results suggest G197del LDLR originated in the late Middle Ages when new opportunities for a Founder Effect were offered by a small group of European Jewish settlers moving eastward. The settlers eventually established a community in Lithuania around 1338. Favorable conditions led the community to grow to a population of 10-12 thousand Ashkenazi Jews living in Lithuania and Poland by 1500.

Russia conquered Lithuania in the 17th century, and Ashkenazi Jews continued their migration east, settling in St. Petersburg. There they remained in relative isolation until the turn of the 19th Century, when significant pogroms sparked a massive emigration by Jewish families. Many traveled to Great Britain, South Africa, Australia, Palestine, and America, carrying with them the G197del LDLR mutation.

There are now many online and other resources available to help people learn about FH and how to protect themselves and their families, including www.FHJourneys.com and www.learnyourlipids.com.  For most patients, the tools to identify and manage high cholesterol associated with FH are available. Among Ashkenazi Jews, we must continually reinforce the risk of FH and the need to research family history, get tested, and talk to a doctor early, before problems become severe and life threatening.

4 Comments

  • This isn’t a big deal; contrary to established wisdom, high cholesterol isn’t necessarily bad for us. Indeed, our bodies NEED cholesterol to function; without it, we are at risk for heart disease. Sound crazy? It’s not; I found all this out from reading “The Great Cholesterol Lie,” a comprehensive book exposing the lies about nutrition we’re force-fed on a daily basis. Ever since reconfiguring my diet according to its advice, I’m healthier, more energetic, and less stressed out. My review of “The Great Cholesterol Lie” is at my website.

  • Yes, I’m sure that researchers are crunching the numbers to identify other factors of the Bio-Chemistry. My Father’s Mother was Ashkenazi with high incidence of Heart disease AND his Spanish-American father and his family had H-D history. My father died of heart failure at 66 and I had a 6 way bypass at 45, 4 months later. I wish my father had alerted me after he had his heart attack with what his Cardiologist briefed him on, but he didn’t!!! Well, at least I know now and am right on it with my Son, who “looks Jewish” by the way. He’s going to get all the tests so he’s not taken by surprise, that’s for sure.

  • I am 48, have heterozygous FH, and also have a 0 calcium score and a c-reactive protein result of 0.11 that shows very little inflammation. I have tried all the statins, zetia and niacin and could not tolerate any of them, so I have used my diet and nutritional experiments to stave off the potential for heart disease that afflicted my paternal ancestors. I have shared my results on the website I listed.

    My latest research is into liver (bile acid production.) Studies in 1987 showed that FH patients who died from heart attacks had no higher cholesterol than the ones who had survived, however they smoked more often and had far less bile acid in their feces. It seems that cholesterol level may be less important that the ability of the liver to remove cholesterol. How to increase bile acids in the feces? Run or exercise daily, especially before breakfast and take milk thistle and Taurine to help the liver out. I continue to test foods and supplements, so please let me know any ideas to try.

  • Robert Bramel

    Not all people with FH develop vascular disease even after a lifetime of extremely high serum cholesterol, so it is far from clear what really causes plaque to form. My readings suggest that approximately twenty percent of those of us with heterozygous FH never develop any significant plaque. Specifically, I am a 66 year old male with a serum total cholesterol of 599, an LDL of 540, absolutely zero coronary calcification by EBCT and “the heart of a 41 year old” by stress ultrasound. It isn’t just that I haven’t had a heart attack yet, I don’t have the beginnings of the disease process. This is similar to finding elderly 3 pack smokers with pink, healthy lungs. There has to be something else going on besides high serum cholesterol in order to start coronary disease, yet no one in the medical community seems interested in really understanding what that something is. (By the way, I eat a very high animal-fat diet, eschew carbohydrates, don’t exercise, and put salt on everything.)

Leave a Reply

Please note: comments may be published in the Algemeiner print edition.


Current day month ye@r *

More...

  • Book Reviews Opinion Robert Gates’ Memoir is a Jaw-Dropping Read (REVIEW)

    Robert Gates’ Memoir is a Jaw-Dropping Read (REVIEW)

    Former Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates’s memoir follows the classic form, telling the story of his years at the Pentagon during the Bush and Obama administrations. He focuses on what he did and experienced personally as secretary, neither writing a broad policy treatise nor recounting the entire history of the administrations in which he served. In so doing, Gates provides penetrating insights about the inner workings of US national security decision-making. Had I been George W. Bush, I would [...]

    Read more →
  • Beliefs and concepts Book Reviews The Media, Israel, and Anti-Semitism (REVIEW)

    The Media, Israel, and Anti-Semitism (REVIEW)

    Pressing Israel: Media Bias Exposed from A-Z by Lee Bender and Jerome Verlin (Pavilion Press, Philadelphia, Pa. 2013) Sophocles said, “What people believe prevails over truth,” Pressing Israel: Media Bias Exposed from A-Z is ideal for the arm chair reader who would like a basic grasp of the terms used in the mainstream media’s presentation of the Arab-Israeli situation as is reported today. This is a book whose time has come. This is a book where the reader gains a [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Blogs William Shatner’s One Man Show Keeps Him in the Limelight (INTERVIEW)

    William Shatner’s One Man Show Keeps Him in the Limelight (INTERVIEW)

    JNS.org – On Thursday, audiences around the country can feel what it is like to be William Shatner, the Jewish actor best known for his portrayal of Captain James T. Kirk on “Star Trek.” Shatner’s one-man show “Shatner’s World”—which was on Broadway and toured Canada, Australia, and the United States—will be presented in nearly 700 movie theaters nationwide for one night only on April 24. Sponsored by Fathom Events and Priceline.com (for whom Shatner has famously served as a pitchman), [...]

    Read more →
  • Blogs Book Reviews The Origins of Palestinian Refugee Relief Efforts (REVIEW)

    The Origins of Palestinian Refugee Relief Efforts (REVIEW)

    Romirowsky and Joffe’s book Religion, Politics and the Origins of Palestine Refugee Relief is an important volume for those interested in truly understanding the origins of the Palestinian refugee issue. Utilizing a treasure trove of newly released documents, the authors link UNRWA’s (United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine) origins to the Quakers/American Friends Service Committee (AFSC). For those readers who thought they knew most of the Middle East story, Romirowsky and Joffe’s version provides another twist. The authors meticulously [...]

    Read more →
  • Sports Israeli Soccer Team Faces Prospect of International Ban

    Israeli Soccer Team Faces Prospect of International Ban

    The Israel National soccer team could be facing a World Cup ban, and other soccer sanctions, unless it alleviates travel restrictions and increases field access for Palestinian players and coaches. The head of the Palestinian Football Association is pushing for international soccer’s governing body, the Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA), to issue a ban on Israel competing internationally, claiming Israel’s restrictive travel for Palestinians is equivalent to a form of oppression. “It’s not only the athletes,” Jibril Rajoub explains. [...]

    Read more →
  • Beliefs and concepts Book Reviews Jewish Author of ‘Eat to Live’ Dishes on Health Care, Nutrition, Disease Prevention

    Jewish Author of ‘Eat to Live’ Dishes on Health Care, Nutrition, Disease Prevention

    JNS.org – While the national debate on “Obamacare” rages on past the recent March 31 sign-up deadline, bestselling Jewish author Dr. Joel Fuhrman says the “current disease care model of what we call ‘health care’ cannot possibly be sustained.” “There is simply not enough money available to support a system in which the lion’s share of expenditures is devoted to acute care, with virtually nothing being spent on preventive medicine, i.e. health care,” Fuhrman says in an interview. “To make [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Jewish Identity ‘Tears of Color’ Art Exhibit Shows Struggles of Israelis With Eating Disorders

    ‘Tears of Color’ Art Exhibit Shows Struggles of Israelis With Eating Disorders

    JNS.org – “This is how I want to be—without fear. Independent. I want to be like a bird. I want to spread my wings.” So reads part of the description beneath one of the 30 paintings on display until the end of May at the ZOA House in Tel Aviv. The collection represents the first-ever art exhibit of its kind: an exhibit created entirely by Israelis in treatment for eating disorders. Dubbed “Tears of Color,” based on one of the [...]

    Read more →
  • Beliefs and concepts Book Reviews Overprotective or Loving? Daughters Reflect on Jewish Mothers in New Anthology

    Overprotective or Loving? Daughters Reflect on Jewish Mothers in New Anthology

    JNS.org – Rachel Ament noticed that she and her friends often shared humorous anecdotes that were typically variations on a theme: overprotective, worrying Jewish moms who smothered them with love. That included Ament’s own mother. “My mom is probably every Jewish stereotype scrunched into one,” the Washington, DC, resident tells JNS.org. “At the root of all these stereotypical, worrying, overprotective moms, is love.” A social media writer for Capital One, as well as a freelance writer, Ament decided about three years [...]

    Read more →



Sign up now to receive our regular news briefs.