Pakistan’s Frightening Blasphemy, Apostasy Laws

June 3, 2014 11:38 am 3 comments

Taliban members in Pakistan. Photo: Screenshot.

The trending story of late is about a woman accused of blasphemy in Sudan.

The court convicted Meriam Yehya Ibrahim, 27, of apostasy, or the renunciation of faith. Ibrahim is Christian, her husband said. But the court considers her to be Muslim because she married a Muslim man.

Under Sudan’s sharia law, Ibrahim was also convicted of adultery and sentenced to 100 lashes because her marriage to a Christian man is considered void.

Sudan is not the only place where blasphemy laws are creating havoc.

My own land of birth Pakistan is reeling from an onslaught of blasphemy-related incidents. Under the banner of this inhuman law, an estimated 1,000 people have been charged since 1987. The Center for Research and Security Studies, based in Islamabad, shows that there were 80 blasphemy complaints in 2011. There are no statistics after that, but analysts believe that 2014 may be a record year.

Individual blasphemy cases filed against the minority Ahmadi and Christian communities are common knowledge, but now there is a trend to apply the blasphemy law towards anyone the establishment does not agree with. The punishment for blasphemy is death.

Last week, Pakistani police detained 68 lawyers who participated in a public protest, criticizing the arrest of a colleague. The irony is that while the lawyers were within their rights to protest, the police officer they were protesting against happened to be named Umar Daraz. Hence, when protesters chanted “Umar,” this was deliberately misconstrued as being against Umar, one the companions of the Prophet Mohammad.

In another sickeningly horrifying incident, a mother who called her son, Mohammad, a devil for misbehaving was also charged with blasphemy against the Prophet. And so it goes. Almost anyone on the street can be charged at any time, any place, and for any offense.

Pakistan is a mostly Sunni Muslim country, but about a fifth of its people are Shia Muslims, who have been targeted in recent violence. According to one unverified report, a Shia has been shot in killed in Pakistan every single day in 2014. All it takes is for some mad mullah to declare a person or community non-Muslim, and the attacks begin. As a result, any person can slam an accusation of apostasy or blasphemy on his or her neighbor, friend, or fellow citizen with impunity. The arrest comes first and then explanations are given. Blasphemy accusations are commonly used to settle personal vendettas but there is no accountability.

There have been attempts by some brave activists to abolish the blasphemy law but to no avail, because they have been threatened and rudely shut up. In Pakistan, a death-threat is not benign as we saw from the sad saga of Governor of Punjab, Salman Taseer who’s murderer was celebrated. Sadly, ordinary Pakistanis don’t want to speak up because of the backlash that usually falls onto anyone who brings up the horrifying ways in which the current situation in Pakistan is playing out.

The blasphemy law’s history dates back to British colonizers of the sub-continent who made it a criminal offence to commit “deliberate and malicious acts intended to outrage religious feelings of ANY [emphasis mine] class by insulting its religious belief.” They intended to protect the diverse faith groups that lived in pre-partition India. The law was retained after partition, but in his presidential address to the constituent Assembly of Pakistan on August 11, 1947, Pakistan’s founder Quaid e Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah said “what are we fighting for? What are we aiming at? It is not theocracy – not for a theocratic state. You are free to go to your temples; you are free to go to your mosques or any other place of worship in this state of Pakistan. You may belong to any religion or caste or creed – that has nothing to do with the business of the state….”

In the 1970s, Pakistan’s Islamist military leader General Zia ul-Haq made several additions to the blasphemy law, including life imprisonment for those defiling or desecrating the Quran or the Prophet. In 1986, the death penalty was introduced for anyone found guilty of defaming Islam.

If one were to ask the ordinary Pakistani in the street or in rural areas where blasphemy cases are common, if they know what the blasphemy law means, they will usually answer that they believe it is part of the Qur’an. In their minds, they are following Islam in implementing and supporting this horrific law.

However, the concepts of blasphemy and apostasy are definitely not supported by the Qur’an, which clearly indicates “there is no compulsion in religion.” The historical connection of blasphemy and Islam is post-Mohammad. After Mohammad’s demise, some tribes who had paid allegiance to him and accepted Islam reneged, and said that their contract was with Mohammad. Now that Mohammad was no longer alive, some of them wanted to revoke their membership in the ‘Muslim’ club and not offer the same allegiance to the current ruler. The ruling religious leadership got terrified that they would lose power, people, and money so they implemented a law (yes the blasphemy law) stating that turning back from Islam would make them liable for death, so they had no choice but to stay. Later, blasphemy laws morphed into something even more sinister and complicated as it is practiced today.

The blasphemy law is contrary to every aspect of universal human rights. Blasphemy laws are in violation of Articles 2, 3, and 4 of the UN Declaration on the Elimination of all Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination Based on Religion and Belief and also violates articles 2 and 4 of the Declaration of the Rights of Persons Belonging to National, Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities.

Ironically, the blasphemy law has been used in Pakistan as a systematic tool of discrimination and abuse against religious minorities, and for ethnic cleansing. Although religious minorities form only 3 percent of Pakistan’s population of almost 167 million, nearly half the victims were Ahmadis, the others Christians and Hindus and today the Shias. The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief observed that the punishments accompanying blasphemy laws are excessive and disproportionate to the offenses.

The text of the blasphemy law is religion specific and very discriminatory. It makes no distinction between deliberate action and unintended mistakes in its application, and has been used indiscriminately to settle personal vendettas.

Pakistan has been front and center in the global arena in pressing limitations on freedom of religion and freedom of expression. In March 2009, Pakistan presented a resolution to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva calling upon the world to formulate laws against the defamation of religion.

Unless world powers and those countries who give huge amounts of aid to Pakistan start sanctions, the situation is not going to change. Pakistan needs to be held accountable for protecting its minorities and for revoking the blasphemy law as soon as possible.

Raheel Raza is president of The Council for Muslims Facing Tomorrow, and a human rights activist based in Toronto, Canada.

Editor’s note: A group called Human Rights For Atheists, Agnostics and Secularists is sponsoring a petition calling on the United Nations to abolish blasphemy laws by adding “the non-religious as an expressly protected group” to its charter and the Statute of the International Court of Justice. To learn more, click here.

3 Comments

  • The author of this article is mistaken. The idea of apostasy and blasphemy is not post-Prophetic. The author should have a better education of the context and the chronological order of events during the life of the Prophet (S), from which the Shariah is derived.

    As the Prophet (peace be upon him) said:
    “It is not permissible to shed the blood of a Muslim except in three cases: An adulterer who had been married, who should be stoned to death; a man who killed another man intentionally, who should be killed; and a man who left Islam and waged war against Allah, the Might and Sublime, and His Messenger, who should be killed, or crucified, or banished from the land.” [Nasai Vol. 5, Book 1, Hadith 4053]

    And the Shariah of Islam is derived both from the book that God revealed and the man He sent as its vehicle, teacher, and Messenger (peace be upon him).

    So if blasphemy/apostasy law exists in Shariah, does this mean that Islam is barbaric?

    No. (Note that the Hadith specifies those who leave Islam and *wage war against it* – in other words, people who make their apostasy a political issue).

    There are three issues here:
    1. The hand of the media in blowing issues out of proportion and making rarely-implemented laws – which are abused in Muslim countries that *do not* correctly follow Shariah – appear to be some sort of fundamental cornerstone of Islamic legislation.
    2. There is a lot of CONTEXT to the apostasy issue in Islam, as applied in a state *correctly and comprehensively* applying Shariah. For honest, open-minded people who would like to be educated on the context and to be able to see the idea of apostasy and blasphemy from a *different* perspective, please enter the following in Google search: “miraatu of_apostasy_blasphemy_and_islam.pdf” and read the document that shows up.
    3. There is another, INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT context that is very often missed out in the “blasphemy/apostasy in Islam” discourse. And that is the “Extremely frightening laws against blasphemy and apostasy” in the same Western and so-called “free” states that present their criticism against Islam. The West may do not use the word “blasphemy” but it effectively treats any anti-establishment discussion as blasphemy. For example, please google this: “huffington post journalist or terrorist”. And this is just one recent article, only discussing life imprisonment. There is no dearth of documented evidence of state-sponsored assassinations against those whom the West conceives as a threat. Just because they do not openly claim such laws does not mean they do not actively engage in them. Do keep in mind that Gitmo and the worst torture cells in the world, where people are held *without criminal charges*, mainly for indulging in the “possibility” of what is blasphemous to Western ideology, remember that is a product of Western society, not Islam.

  • ” The historical connection of blasphemy and Islam is post-Mohammad. After Mohammad’s demise, some tribes who had paid allegiance to him and accepted Islam reneged, and said that their contract was with Mohammad. Now that Mohammad was no longer alive, some of them wanted to revoke their membership in the ‘Muslim’ club and not offer the same allegiance to the current ruler. The ruling religious leadership got terrified that they would lose power, people, and money so they implemented a law (yes the blasphemy law) stating that turning back from Islam would make them liable for death, so they had no choice but to stay. Later, blasphemy laws morphed into something even more sinister and complicated as it is practiced today.”
    Interesting! I think the main reason was the tribes refusing to pay zakat tax and that was rebellion and treated like rebellion, with force.
    Also, indeed there are no injunctions in the Quran dealing with apostasy. All that is said for an apostate is that such a person will go to hell. This leads me to conclude that death for apostasy goes against the grain of Islam because when you kill someone for apostasy you take away from the apostate the facility to repent. (The promise of hell is to make the person think again and give him/her a chance to repent.)Of course the Prophet (SAW) never punished anyone with death for apostasy.

  • Keith Kevelson

    It’s good to see more people speaking up on this issue, especially Muslims. All too often, individuals who have called for inclusion of these facts in school curricula, or who have called for sanctions against nations that pursue such tyrannical theocracy, have been accused of “hate speech” or “inciting hatred.” Also, corporate lobbyists, mainly in resource-rich nations, have been trying to mask the persecution religious-dissenters face on a daily basis to secure contracts. However, if enough people coordinate their efforts, these laws will surely fall.

    One would hope that the British would kick Pakistan out of the Commonwealth of Nations for this, especially considering its vicious persecution of the Ahmaddi. It’s a struggle just to get the US to stop sending military aid to Pakistan though.

Leave a Reply

Please note: comments may be published in the Algemeiner print edition.


Current day month ye@r *

More...

  • Arts and Culture Middle East Hamas Commander Reportedly Urges Hezbollah to Join Forces Against Israel

    Hamas Commander Reportedly Urges Hezbollah to Join Forces Against Israel

    JNS.org – Five months after Israeli forces tried to assassinate Hamas military commander Mohammed Deif in Gaza, Deif appears to have signed a letter that the terrorist group claims he wrote in hiding. The letter, addressed to Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah, expressed Deif’s condolences for the death of Hezbollah terrorists during Sunday’s reported Israeli airstrike in Syria. Deif is said to have survived multiple assassination attempts, but he has not been seen in public for years. According to the Hezbollah-linked Al-Manar [...]

    Read more →
  • Jewish Identity Theater Shlomo Carlebach Musical Has the Soul to Heal Frayed Race Relations

    Shlomo Carlebach Musical Has the Soul to Heal Frayed Race Relations

    JNS.org – The cracks that had been simply painted over for so long began to show in Ferguson, Mo., in November 2014, but in truth they had begun to open wide much earlier—on Saturday, July 13, 2013. That is when a jury in Sanford, Fla., acquitted George Zimmerman of culpability for the death of a 17-year-old black man, Trayvon Martin. The cracks receded from view over time, as other news obscured them. Then came the evening of Aug. 9, 2014, [...]

    Read more →
  • Theater US & Canada ‘Homeland’ Season Finale Stirs Controversy After Comparing Menachem Begin to Taliban Leader

    ‘Homeland’ Season Finale Stirs Controversy After Comparing Menachem Begin to Taliban Leader

    A controversial scene in the season finale of Homeland sparked outrage by comparing former Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin to a fictional Taliban leader, the UK’s Daily Mail reported. In the season 4 finale episode, which aired on Dec. 21, CIA black ops director Dar Adal, played by F. Murray Abraham, justifies a deal he made with a Taliban leader by referencing Begin. He makes the remarks in a conversation with former CIA director Saul Berenson, a Jewish character played by Mandy [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Spirituality/Tradition Placing Matisyahu Back Within a Life of Observance

    Placing Matisyahu Back Within a Life of Observance

    Shining Light on Fiction During the North Korea-Sony saga, we learned two important lessons. The first is that there are two sides to this story, and neither of them are correct because ultimately we should have neither inappropriate movies nor dictators. The second is that we cannot remain entirely fixed on the religious world, but we also must see beyond the external, secular view of reality. It’s important to ground our Torah-based thoughts into real-life activism. To view our act [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Blogs Nine Decades of Moses at the Movies

    Nine Decades of Moses at the Movies

    JNS.org – Hollywood has had its share of big-budget biblical flops, but until now, the Exodus narrative has not been among them. Studios have brought Moses to the big screen sparingly, but in ways that defined the image and character of Moses for each generation of audiences. The first biblical epic In 1923, director Cecil B. DeMille left it to the American public to decide the subject of his next movie for Paramount. DeMille received a letter from a mechanic [...]

    Read more →
  • Arts and Culture Blogs Exodus on Screen (REVIEW)

    Exodus on Screen (REVIEW)

    JNS.org – The story of the Exodus from Egypt is a tale as old as time itself, to borrow a turn of phrase. It’s retold every Passover, both at the seder table and whenever “The Ten Commandments” is aired on television. But the latest adaptation—Ridley Scott’s epic film, “Exodus: Gods and Kings”—fails to meet expectations. Scott’s “Exodus” alters the source material to service the story and ground the tale, but the attempt to reinvent the biblical narrative becomes laughable. Moses [...]

    Read more →
  • Jewish Identity Lifestyle ‘Jewish Food Movement’ Comes of Age

    ‘Jewish Food Movement’ Comes of Age

    JNS.org - In December 2007, leaders of the Hazon nonprofit drafted seven-year goals for what they coined as the “Jewish Food Movement,” which has since been characterized by the increased prioritization of healthy eating, sustainable agriculture, and food-related activism in the Jewish community. What do the next seven years hold in store? “One thing I would like to see happen in the next seven years is [regarding] the issue of sugar, soda, and obesity, [seeing] what would it be like to rally the [...]

    Read more →
  • Blogs Education Seeds of ‘Start-Up Nation’ Cultivated by Israel Sci-Tech Schools

    Seeds of ‘Start-Up Nation’ Cultivated by Israel Sci-Tech Schools

    JNS.org – Forget the dioramas. How about working on an Israeli Air Force drone? That’s exactly the kind of beyond-their-years access enjoyed by students at the Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) industrial vocational high school run by Israel Sci-Tech Schools, the largest education network in the Jewish state. More than 300 students (250 on the high school level and 68 at a two-year vocational academy) get hands-on training in the disciplines of aviation mechanics, electricity and energy control, and unmanned air [...]

    Read more →



Sign up now to receive our regular news briefs.