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January 6, 2012 11:52 am

EXCLUSIVE: Rick Santorum Explains West Bank Comments

avatar by Zachary Lichaa

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Rick Santorum. Photo: iowapolitics.com

With brighter lights shining on him since the Iowa caucuses, Rick Santorum’s views on major political issues are receiving more attention than ever.  One of those issues is the West Bank, and in regards to comments he made six weeks ago about the contested territory, The Algemeiner spoke with Santorum.

“Here is my position on this and the reason I answered it the way I did, that area which is part of Israel which was taken justifiably via war is up to the State of Israel to determine its fate.” When asked if he would advocate for the annexation of the territories he said, “when you you say “would I advocate for” the answer is no, I wouldn’t “advocate for” I would be working with my ally and supporting them in what they determine is in the best interests of their country.”

The former Pennsylvania Senator made a strong showing in Iowa’s caucuses earlier this week, coming in second to Mitt Romney by just 8 votes.  Now that he’s been thrust into the national spotlight even further, Santorum’s views on foreign policy are of greater importance to the American public as they help decide who will become the Republican nominee for President.

In our interview with the Presidential hopeful, Santorum explained what his approach would be, in dealing with the Israeli government on the issue of settlements in the West Bank.

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“I would not be as previous Presidents have,” he continued “pushing the Israelis toward a particular result, because we believe it is in the best interests of our country or some sort of ‘Peace,’ that we have determined is in the best interests of Israel and the region.” Santorum concluded “so my position has been that this is all Israeli territory, it was gained through legitimate means, and they have the right of determining what happens to that ground and to the people who live there.”

Israel’s control of The West Bank is one of the primary issues of concern related to negotiations between Palestinian and Israeli negotiators, including the status of such land within any peace agreement.  Negotiators from the two sides will be meeting in Jordan next Monday, although neither Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu or Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas will be attending.

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  • Chaim

    his stated view is not helpful since it allows the israelis to adopt an irrational policy and then blame it on the US. This is exactly what happened when Sharon supported an independent “Palestinian” state. Bush than began to pressure him to follow thru. In turn, the PM was able to work toward that irrational goal and at the same time claim that he’s pressured by the US whose support we cannot afford to lose. I prefer Ron Paul’s foreign policy when it comes to Israel. It will force the Israeli’s to be responsible.

  • David Ha’ivri

    Yes, the West Bank is Israeli territory and Israel should End the Occupation Now! http://www.algemeiner.com/2011/12/26/end-the-occupation-%E2%80%93-now-2/
    My best wishing to Sen. Rick Santorum.

  • salvage

    >the Rebbe says that if someone is religious, no matter the religion, it is good.

    Really? Santorum’s religion teaches him that unless you accept Jesus Christ as your saviour and messiah you will be thrown into Hell to be tortured like a wicked soul.

    The Rebbe too.

    And that’s good is it?

    • Miriam

      He can believe what he wants. It’s a free country. In my book, no extreme is good–Christian, Jewish, or Muslim.
      What bothers me more is his extreme view on right to life. Am I correct that he is against contraceptives? If that is so, he is WAY out of line! Next thing you know he’ll be preaching “barefoot and pregnant” for women. No thank you!!!!

      • salvage

        >Am I correct that he is against contraceptives?

        Based on some recent statements yes you are.

        He’s quite the stupid loony.

    • LaAniyas Dayti

      1) Perhaps you acquaint yourself with that religion’s development since the Ecumenical Council.

      2) In the ‘fight’ for a general prayer in schools, any religion was for it, all atheists and assorted liberal’s (including the Reform movement) and shvartzyor were against.

      3) The teaching of Evolution (of Species) as a fact of science, is opposed in a similar pattern.

      4) The common denominator in this century (carrying on from the end of the last) is belief in a Creator.

      5) Perhaps you ought to ponder the effect of a Santorum or a Palin in the White House, and how it would affect the ‘atmosphere’ your children or grandchildren grow up in. Juxtapose this with the effect of Bill and Monica, which has left a legacy that affects Jewish marital life in an alarming way. (Male expectations have demoralized many a pure woman who has lost the right to be partner in what is currently considered appropriate. Ask any marriage counselor.)

      • salvage

        1) Perhaps you acquaint yourself with that religion’s development since the Ecumenical Council.

        They’ve come to the conclusion that you no longer need Jesus for salvation? Hell is not true? Really?

        2) In the ‘fight’ for a general prayer in schools, any religion was for it, all atheists and assorted liberal’s (including the Reform movement) and shvartzyor were against.

        Uh sure?

        3) The teaching of Evolution (of Species) as a fact of science, is opposed in a similar pattern.

        ‘kay.

        4) The common denominator in this century (carrying on from the end of the last) is belief in a Creator.

        I think that sort of silly thing has been going on for a lot longer.

        5) Perhaps you ought to ponder the effect of a Santorum or a Palin in the White House, and how it would affect the ‘atmosphere’ your children or grandchildren grow up in.

        I’m not sure what would happen, they have a lot of stupid crazy ideas but the system has a lot of checks and balances.

        > Juxtapose this with the effect of Bill and Monica, which has left a legacy that affects Jewish marital life in an alarming way.(Male expectations have demoralized many a pure woman who has lost the right to be partner in what is currently considered appropriate. Ask any marriage counselor.)

        I have no idea what you’re saying here but if you marriage is affected by people who are not you and have nothing to do with you than your marriage was already in trouble.

  • Hmmm. Sounds believable, but not all that sounds believable is.

    In addition, though I haven’t taken to any republican characters ever, the Rebbe says that if someone is religious, no matter the religion, it is good.

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