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January 8, 2012 3:53 pm

Dateline Beit Shemesh: Jay Michaelson Suffers an Acute Attack of Harediphobia

avatar by Moshe Averick

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Left-wing journalist Jay Michaelson, guilty of Harediphobia.

No, Jay Michaelson, ultra-liberal, leftist, and progressive columnist for the Forward did not write that Haredi Jews use Christian blood for baking Matzah on Passover. However, in his all too predictable Haredi-bashing article entitled “Fighting Back Against Fundamentalism” it was about the only accusation that he did not level against what is commonly referred to as the “ultra-orthodox” community in Israel. The article is about the recent problems in the religious neighborhoods of Bet Shemesh, Israel. Michaelson trots out the usual stock clichés like “Iran-ization of Israel,” that Haredi population growth “threatens secular Jewish culture,” and worst of all, the Haredim are “deliberately ignorant of modernity” (that means they don’t like hip-hop music, don’t glorify the killing of unborn children, and don’t instruct teenagers in the use of condoms).

Extremists cause trouble everywhere, whether in the form of the pathetic losers who populate the “occupy” movements, liberal activists who want to destroy religious freedom in this country by forcing everyone to support homosexual marriage, or a handful of zealots in the Israeli city of Bet Shemesh. Their activities have already been condemned by the major orthodox rabbinic groups in the United States, both centrist and Haredi, and even by the Ultra-Orthodox Eidah Haredis in Jerusalem. I have a brother and sister-in-law, nephews and nieces, five children, and four grandchildren living in Bet Shemesh, so I do have some inside sources on what is going on there. My twin daughters were actually interviewed on Israeli TV at a recent demonstration in that city (by the way, they looked really cute on TV). Although it is clear that most of the problems are caused by a small group of trouble-makers, self-righteous progressives like Michaelson feel the need to demonize an entire community.

Michaelson is that annoying type of liberal who always expresses love and compassion for everyone else: baby seals, endangered species of all kinds, “suffering” Palestinians who must endure check-points manned by Israeli soldiers (after all, just because some Palestinians murder Jews, do we have to check all of them?!), homosexuals who are “bullied,” and of course maligned Moslems (“liberals have rightly rallied around the cause of Islamophobia”). However, for his own people, he reverts back to the tried-and-true method of sinat chinam, baseless hatred; the sin for which, our sages tell us, the Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed. I guarantee you there is one word that will never enter the “liberal,” “loving,” and “compassionate” vocabulary of our friend Mr. Michaelson: Harediphobia, even though it is clear that Michealson suffers from this disease: “the Haredi population of Israel is set to grow 580% in the next half-century…threatening…secular jewish culture [and] non-fundamentalist Judaism…ignoring this threat would bring costs as severe as ignoring assimilation or anti-semitism…the Jewish future they create looks more like Islamist Iran than any Jewish culture that I, and most progressives, would want to be part of.”

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Michaelson’s hypocrisy is out in the open for all to see. When a gunman murdered two teenagers at a gay youth center in Tel Aviv in August, 2009 (the crime is still unsolved), he wrote the following: “Here is how it happens. First, demagogues use incendiary rhetoric to inflame passions against a group or individual. Next, a “lone gunman” attacks the target of that rhetoric. Then, the same demagogues who fanned the flames in the first place condemn the attack, and express shock – shock! – that such a thing could happen.” If God forbid, someone commits an act of violence against a Haredi individual in Israel, you can be sure our demagogue friend at the Forward will be the first to issue a condemnation and express shock!

It is interesting to note that even Israel Harel, who writes for the super left-wing and notoriously anti-religious Israeli newspaper, Ha’aretz, wrote the following in a recent article about the brouhaha in Bet Shemesh, “From the strident tones of the past few days, one can safely assume that the goal of most of the critics…is Haredi-bashing, pure and simple.” Amen and enough said.

An Afterthought

Michaelson proposes all kinds of solutions to solve the “Haredi Problem.” (Sound familiar?) They range from persuading individual donors and foundations not to give money to Haredi institutions to – I’m not kidding – sending missionaries into the Haredi community to convince them to be more liberal! “I think we need to proselytize for non-fundamentalist Jewish culture within the Haredi world…We can and should make the case…that a life of engagement with the modern world is better than the ghetto.”

What is most comical about this last idea is that Michaelson seems to be in complete denial about what is going on around him. Liberal, secularized Judaism is dying. The Reform and Conservative movements – whose success among American Jews was never a spiritual phenomena, but rather a sociological one –  are scrambling for money to support their institutions and for congregants to fill their Temples. Intermarriage and apathy have decimated their ranks. How will you possibly convince the Haredim to be more like you? With arguments like the following, from your September, 2007 Forward article?: “I don’t believe the nonsense that our religion often spreads about God, Torah, and Israel. But I’ve found that there is something deeper than belief.”

Mr. Michaelson, you cannot even convince your own children to continue with your liberal, watered down form of Judaism. Whereas you compare the Torah with the latest issue of the Village Voice and cut out the parts of the Torah that don’t match, your children don’t bother. They have seen through the sham. They skip the Torah altogether and just read the Village Voice. You write about the Haredim, “If this is the Jewish future, count me out.” What a great tragedy (after all, you are my Jewish brother), you’ve already been counted out of the Jewish future and don’t even know it.

If you wish to be notified when Rabbi Averick’s new columns appear, send an email to moe.david@hotmail.com and simply write the word Subscribe in the subject bar.  Rabbi Moshe Averick is an orthodox rabbi and author of Nonsense of a High Order: The Confused and Illusory World of the Atheist. It is available on Amazon.com and Kindle. Rabbi Averick can be reached via his website. .


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  • According to “Torah Judaism” is excluding women from public places one of those things which is “not inherently immoral” and also not “obligatory” (like instituting slavery)?

  • Rabbi Averick makes these two contradictory comments: 1) “All Jews are part of the same nation, we are connected and responsible for each other whether we like it or not…. But that means when Jews, particularly orthodox who purport to represent the Torah act like gangsters, it humiliates us all, they are our family.” and 2) “What does what I said have to do with raising children to be independent thinkers? There is not and has not ever been a nation that emphasizes thinking and learning like the Jewish people. The entire study of Talmud which is the primary religious obligation of Jews is based on developing highly sophisticated intellectual skills.”

    An independent thinker is a person who is able and willing to choose his own responsibilities — and who understands that other people’s actions cannot rationally be taken to impose responsibilities, obligations, or humiliation upon him. That is, you cannot honestly be an independent thinker and look upon yourself as any part of a collective (racial, religious, national, or whatever).

    Collective humiliation and independent thinking are mutually exclusive.

    • jp

      So when Moshe says that the actions of some Jews humiliate all, then that’s because Jews are all joined as one nation.

      But when Michaelson says that the actions of some Haredim humiliate all, then suddenly that’s bigotry and extremism.

      Weird.

      • “Weird” it just might be.

        It’s a little hard to see what Moshe is trying to get at most of the time. His pronouncement rarely have much logic behind them, and he doesn’t state much of any very clearly — other than to complain that he finds it “incomprehensible” that anyone would criticize anything he says.

  • rachel

    I don’t have the patience to read all the Stoddard and other comments. So you don’t have to read mine, but, here it is:

    What was perpetrated in Beit Shemesh was criminal and an endangerment of the welfare of a minor.

    These so-called Haredim who profess to be Jews should begin practicing Judaism.

    Perhaps Israel should deliver to each one of them a visa and a one way ticket to Iran.

    • Am I missing something — or has nobody bothered to mention what actually happened and why people are upset?

      Also, Israel should give the rulers in Iran a visa and a one-way ticket to the otherworld.

      • This is not clear: according to “Torah Judaism” is excluding women from public places one of those things which is “not inherently immoral”?

    • Rachel,

      Please don’t misunderstand me. Those responsible for these actions are nothing but thugs with beards and long coats and should unceremoniously be thrown in jail. My own daughters were spit on.

      It is horribly shameful that people who profess to be so religious act this way. Lucky for them I am not in charge of security at the school. I am not a believer in the M.Ghandi approach. The point you raise is not in question.

      I think your idea has merit. All the thugs in Bet Shemesh together with the so called peaceniks who care more about “Palestinian suffering” than murdered Jewish children should be put on a plane together and dumped on an Island in the Pacific. They deserve each other.

      • …peaceniks who care more about “Palestinian suffering” than murdered Jewish children …

        My understanding is that the land from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea is legally known as “Jewish Palestine.” So aren’t murdered Jewish children in that area counted as part of “Palestinian suffering”?

        Any notions that “Jews can’t be Palestinians” or “Palestinians can’t be Jews” seem utterly ridiculous (just another form of vicious antisemitism).

        As an aside, I recently had an interesting conversation with a visitor from Israel. I asked just how scary it was to live in Israel given all the stuff I hear about Muslim terrorists. She said that living in Israel was quite normal, but whenever they heard about things like the Columbine shooting, they thought that life in the U.S. must be terribly scary.

        Anyhow, are those “visas to oblivion” ready for the Iranian rulers? At least their nuclear bomb scientists seem to be getting them . . . .

    • Well, there are a lot of comments. There is just so much wrong with Rabbi Averick’s positions that it is hard to know where to stop.

  • David Pinto

    Jay Michaelson did not suffer an acute attack of Harediphobia; he told the truth. Unfortunately, the Algemeiner does not want to hear the truth, so it attacks the messenger.

  • Karsten Bannier

    One cannot discriminate against the entire Haredi sect because a handfull of mentally disurbed Jews.These people are certainly not ultra orthodox Jews because if they were so “frum”,they would not be acting in this manner.The Jewish community here in Johannesburg have been taken aback by this behaviour & a lot of our Rabbis have made it the subject of their Shabbat sermon.I feel ashamed as a Jew when the “goyim” ask me if I have read the latest article regarding this problem in Bet Shemesh.

    • I could understand being ashamed over something your kids did, or maybe even your parents — but over people you don’t know or associate with?

      It is the people who feel that if some Jews are bad, then that shows that Judaism must bad, and all Jews should give it up, who should be ashamed. (Likewise, it is people who feel that if some atheists are bad, then that shows that atheism must be bad, and all atheists should give it up, who should be ashamed rather than full of themselves.)

      • Steven,
        All Jews are part of the same nation, we are connected and responsible for each other whether we like it or not. I happen to like it very much.
        But that means when Jews, particularly orthodox who purport to represent the Torah act like gangsters, it humiliates us all, they are our family.

        • Moshe,

          Okay, if that is your religious doctrine, then you do have to live with the consequences. Unfortunately, like so many religious doctrines, it does not represent the most reasonable way to deal with people, viz., on their own merits (or demerits) as self-responsible individuals.

          Even in a real family, it is better to raise children to be independent thinkers (rather than collectivist drones who grow up to be thugs and “occupiers”).

          But it is your choice.

          • Steve,

            As with many of your comments, I find them incomprehensible. What does what I said have to do with raising children to be independent thinkers? There is not and has not ever been a nation that emphasizes thinking and learning like the Jewish people. The entire study of Talmud which is the primary religious obligation of Jews is based on developing highly sophisticated intellectual skills.

          • Moshe,

            What is supposed to be so “sophisticated” about feeling guilty (or “humiliated”) by crimes that you did not commit (or have anything whatsoever to do with)?

            That seems more like mindless conformity than any real intellectual skill.

          • Moshe,

            It is sometimes the case that you need to think about something in order to comprehend it. Sorry if that doesn’t seem fair to you.

    • Karsten,

      I agree and the bottom line is that all Orthodox Jews are ashamed of this behavior. That is why it is such an incredible “chillul Hashem”, a desecration of God’s name, when Jews who represent themselves as Torah Jews act this way.

      • Karsten Bannier

        Moshe

        One of our cornerstones is to show love for your fellow Jew & this comes with taking responsibility for them & unfortunately shame when they act in an evil manner,no matter if they are observant Jews or not.After all,what are we if we are not connected to each other? Gut Shabos !

        • There is an alternative. We could be self-respecting people who stand on our own two feet — and who respect the right and responsibility of others to do the same.

  • Rabbi Averick: “A. All human beings are created in the image of God.”

    The image of God as a slave, or the image of God as a master?

    Or:

    The image of God as a productive business executive, or the image of God as a mooching “occupier”?

    Or:

    The image of God as an Obama/Ayers/Wright/Holder type, or the image of God as a Washington/Adams/Jefferson/Madison type?

    How is anyone supposed to make any sense out of the notion of “the image of God”?

    • Steve,

      Read the Declaration of Independence and see if you can figure it out. The founding fathers seemed to make sense out of it.

      • In other words, you continue to refuse to explain yourself.

        And note well: there is nothing about “God’s image” in either the Declaration of Independence or the Constitution.

        Sorry, your diversionary tactic still does not explain what you think and feel. (It might give some hint, but certainly not in your favor.)

        • Steve,

          “We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are CREATED equal, that they have been endowed by their CREATOR with certain unalienable rights, and among those are the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

          What do you think is the basis of this concept if not the Biblical concept that all men are created in the image of God?

          • The Founders were men of the Enlightenment. For them, the Biblical concept of the “image of God” was not a serious consideration. They inclined more toward the Deistic idea of “non-intervention”. That is, they thought in terms of natural processes rather than supernatural miracles.

            They thought of the “CREATOR” as simply nature</b as such. They did not get the idea of individual rights from the Bible, or revelation, or the like. They got the idea by using reason in the observation of nature. The "image of God" never entered the picture.

          • The Founders were men of the Enlightenment. For them, the Biblical concept of the “image of God” was not a serious consideration. They inclined more toward the Deistic idea of “non-intervention”. That is, they thought in terms of natural processes rather than supernatural miracles.

            They thought of the “CREATOR” as simply nature as such. They did not get the idea of individual rights from the Bible, or revelation, or the like. They got the idea by using reason in the observation of nature. The “image of God” never entered the picture.

  • Moshe,

    Just a note:

    You still have not explained your support for slavery — or your irrational fear of atheism.

    Any ideas?

    • Steve,

      I explained, in abbreviated form, some of the principles of the Torah concept of servitude. Did you read it?
      As I said, there is no obligation to institute servitude, and I haven’t any desire to re-institute it either. I don’t know what you mean when you say “my support for slavery.”

      • Can you supply the link? I don’t remember seeing it.

        • Well, maybe you were referring to the post where this was included: “D. All “slaves” were converted to Judaism …” (on January 8, 2012 12:44 pm)

          If so, then your “abbreviated explanation” consisted of saying, “While there is certainly no obligation to have an institution of servitude it is clear from the Torah that it is not inherently immoral.

          But that is merely a claim not an explanation or argument to support your position — and it certainly does not make anything “clear“.

          Is it your idea that slavery is okay if you believe in God? Is that condition supposed to apply only to the masters, only to the slaves, or to both?

          Of course, such an argument amounts only to claiming that slavery is okay if you believe in slavery.

          Or is the argument supposed to be that slavery is okay if you believe in being “nice” to the slaves (on the absurd assumption that holding someone as slave is somehow miraculously not “not-nice” in the first place).

      • Moshe wrote: ‘As I said, there is no obligation to institute servitude, and I haven’t any desire to re-institute it either. I don’t know what you mean when you say “my support for slavery.”

        By your “support for slavery,” I mean your position that even though there is no obligation to “institute servitude,” you still maintain that it could be proper to enforce it.

      • Rabbi Moshe Averick on slavery: “I am just pointing out why [involuntary servitude] is not inherently immoral if done in the proper way.“

        How far does the Rabbi think it is down that slippery slope of servitude to having a religious belief that “pedophilia is not inherently immoral if done the proper way”?

        What in hell could ever be the “proper way” to do either slavery or pedophilia???!!! You are really getting far out on the fringes of religious advocacy . . . .

      • Rabbi Averick wrote …”there are any number of people in the world who[se] lives would be greatly improved if they were owned and taken care of by a benevolent master.”

        The vicious immorality of that belief is incredible — and clearly rationally unjustifiable and immoral.

        If you can believe in the worthiness of “a benevolent master,” is there any way you can be above wanting to bring theocracy to America?

        Does Rabbi Averick really believe, for instance, that the lives of atheists would be “greatly improved” if they were enslaved to prevent them from acting out as Darwinists?

      • Now I suppose you might object that I am being hard on you, or trying to engage in heated criticism, but come on. When you advocate for slavery as “not inherently immoral,” you cannot reasonably expect only meek acquiescence. This is America, after all, and not everyone is a Republican or Democrat (i.e., a socialist/statist).

      • jp

        Moshe, if you could be so kind, could you tell us why you have no desire to reinstitute servitude?

        If you take your morality from God, and hold that servitude is not immoral if done properly, then on what basis do find reinstitution of servitude undesirable, especially when you also hold that servitude would improve the lives of the planet’s neediest people?

        • Nice work, jp, condensing it down to a nice, simple question.

          Whereas I go charging in with guns blazing trying to shoot up every major flaw in sight.

          I was figuring that offering lots of option would increase the odds of getting some answers (though it doesn’t appear to be working too well).

        • JP,

          The problem is that you still have not accepted your own profound ignorance of how Torah Judaism functions. YOu need to listen carefully to what I am teaching you, like a student, not like a colleague. I gave you a simple example and you ignored it completely. There are several commandments in the Torah dealing with divorce. Does that mean we should go around trying to convince people to get divorced in order to fulfill those commandments? I do not believe that capital punishment is inherently immoral, that does not mean we should jump at any chance to put a criminal to death. I did not say that servitude would improve the lives of the world’s neediest people, YOU said that. I said that there are any number of people, who due to their own human weaknesses and poor choices have created for themselves a state of being where they lives would be greatly improved if instead of living a zombie like existence, they were under the care of a benevolent master who would give them a framework where they could start to live some sort of productive life. Even though I think that is true, and that there would not be anything inherently immoral about it, that does not mean that I advocate doing it. In a theoretical sense I stand by what I wrote, in practical reality it is much more complicated.
          Please listen carefully JP, there is a big difference between an action not being inherently immoral, and an action being OBLIGATORY.

          • Based on that explanation, then, the problem is with “Torah Judaism” — if it actually is as you claim it to be.

            According to your description, “Torah Judaism” stands for the principle that, if they are so inclined, Jews may enslave people of whose “lifestyles” they do not approve — and that such enslavement is not “inherently immoral.”

            The notion of a “benevolent master” is as wrongheaded as the notion of a “benevolent dictator.” Reality just isn’t ever going to conform to such crazy fantasies.

          • jp

            I don’t condemn you for thinking servitude should be obligatory, merely for thinking that it’s permissable.

            But I concede I may need education on the matter. Moshe, could you educate me as to what penalty the Torah sets for beating a slave roughly enough that the slave dies of their injuries three days later?

          • jp

            Never mind, Moshe, I found it myself:

            http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0221.htm

            Turns out that the penalty of losing your property (the now-dead servant) is adequate punishment, and no further disciplinary action is required.

            Seems fair, and much better than those other immoral systems where they don’t do things properly.

  • salvage

    Follow the shoe!

    Follow the gourd!

    Women should be coverd!

    Women should be slightly covered!

    Women should dress as they please!

    And on it goes.

    Isn’t it weird that the Chosen Peiple of the One True God of the One True Torah are so fractured into sects and sub-sects?

    Make one think that maybe it’s not quite as One True as they think.

  • Brian Westley

    “Brian, You may have a perception problem. Either re read the article or see a neurologist asap.”

    Uh, no. I actually get news from several sources, and these religious pricks have actually thrown shit at little girls:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-15237018

    • jp

      But Moshe’s not defending them, only saying that all other haredim should not automatically be tarred with the same brush, which is a fair point.

      There’s so much fail in the rest of the article that there’s no need to make up stuff that isn’t there.

      Now that Moshe is offended at being tarred by association with these extremists, he could perhaps reflect on his constant tarring of atheists by association with Stalin or Dahmer, for example, and emerge from the experience wiser and more humble.

      • moshe averick

        JP,

        You don’t seem to get my point no matter how many times I say it. IF I tarred atheists the way you describe I would not spend so much time exchanging comments and opinions with them. I do, however, attack ATHEISM as an ideology and as a worldview. I associate ATHEISM with Stalin and DAhmer, not any particular person who claims to be a non-believer. It is the ideological and philosophical implications of atheism that are dangerous. If a person grows up believing that a human being is nothing more than a glorified bacterium and that we are nothing more than a peculiar arrangement of atoms and chemicals, in the long run that will have terrible consequences. It does not mean that I suspect you or salvage of molesting children,.

        • Rabbi Averick explains, “I associate ATHEISM with Stalin and DAhmer,…”

          Do you then associate THEISM with Manson, Gregory IX, Koresh, Henry VIII, etc.?

        • Moshe feels that “It is the ideological and philosophical implications of atheism that are dangerous.”

          What exactly do you think is dangerous about the philosophy that people should deal rationally with nature rather than irrationally indulging in supernaturalist fantasies?

        • The Rabbi feels it’s dangerous “If a person grows up believing that a human being is nothing more than a glorified bacterium …”

          But Moshe has the absurd idea that a person who doesn’t believe in God is somehow forced to accept such an idiotic notion. How is that supposed to work?

          A human being is no more a “glorified bacterium” and he is a “creation of God.” Both of those notion are ridiculous and fly in the face of reality.

        • jp

          Look Moshe, some of my best friends are Jews, and nearly all the Jews I know are good people but Judaism as a philosophy is an insidious force of darkness in the world based on greed and secretive political manipulation. While I’m happy to talk to you on your blog, you have to understand that the true representatives of Judaism are people like the Rothschilds and all the other Mossad goons like Wolfowitz who secretly run America, making the US dance like a puppet to start wars on the Arabs, and whose insidious actions are a direct consequence of their Judaism.

          Now, I don’t believe a word of what I wrote above, but that’s how you come across when you talk of atheism.

          Take the craziest, most out-there World-Zionist-Conspiracy nut you can think of, swap out the terms for atheism, and that’s YOU.

          If you can’t see this, then you may possibly be the least self-aware person I’ve ever encountered, unless you’re doing it deliberately, which would be worse.

        • Rabbi Moshe Averick admits, “I do, however, attack ATHEISM as an ideology and as a worldview.

          The reason he can’t make a coherent attack is that he has set up a non-existent target. There is no such thing as an “ideology/worldview” constituted by “ATHEISM.”

          Atheism is nothing more than the choice not to believe in God.

          Now there are plenty of good reasons not to believe in God, but there are bad ones, too. For instance, one good reason would be the very incoherence of the idea of something supernatural, and the total lack of evidence for anything of the sort. One bad reason, on the other hand, would be taking the subjectivist view that nothing exists (that everything is an illusion).

          It should be noted that knowing that a person is an ATHEIST tells you absolutely nothing about what “ideology/worldview” that person actually has.

  • I am curious, Moshe.

    When the temple brings back servitude (or whatever the story is supposed to be) are you aiming to be a master or a slave? So far, you’ve been clear as mud on this issue (claiming to be misunderstood without ever having bothered to try to explain yourself).

    • Well, wrong article. But the right author, so it ought to work out.

  • dutchboy27

    Brian, You may have a perception problem. Either re read the article or see a neurologist asap.

    Moshe, The problem may be that the hareidi follow like lemmings. And that is a danger that the average Israeli is concerned with. I find some of your tangents so off the point as well. It’s one thing to enforce a rule in your own community. Its altogether another thing to try to enforce your crap on people that are not in your community. Why isnt it Sinat Chinum when the hareidi act repugnantly towards other Jews?

    • Dutchboy,

      It is obviously baseless hatred when they act that way. The article had nothing to do about justifying the actions of extremist elements in the Hareidi community, they have already been condemned from many different corners. You do not demonize a community because of few zealots. If in Michaelson’s article we would have substituted “colored” for “haredi” we would have assumed Michaelson was a card carrying member of the Klu Klux Klan. You do not slander the entire black community because a few extremists like Jeremiah Wright or Al Sharpton. Michaelson is much too sensitive and politically correct for that, but he has no problem doing it to other Jews.

      I know the Hareidi community from the inside. Most people have one dimensional stereotypical notions about what it is like. I would also add that most people have no idea of the history of the persecution of the Hareidi community by the Secular/Socialist Zionist movement and governments. It is a shameful, mostly covered up part of the history of political Zionism. Most of the tension that exists between the religious and secular communities in Israel today is almost entirely the fault of the extremist secular tendencies and policies of the socialist founders of the State of Israel.

    • Puzzled

      Why do you single out haredi people for being lemmings? Don’t most people just follow. The only difference is what they follow. The secular Israeli’s do the same thing – except they follow the secular media, etc., in their own group think.

      • Moshe Averick

        Puzzled,

        I think you made a good point. Part of the issue here is that people – quite justifiably – hold the Hareidi community to a higher standard because of their religious beliefs.
        It is a terrible smear on the Torah and as it were, God himself, when even a small number of “religious” Jews act this way.

  • Kevin Bjornson

    At least Moshe is not focusing his big gun on the elusive threat of culturally Jewish secularism. Let us be thankful for small favors, and hope that he may someday be a card-carrying member of the humanist community (which has been under threat for 2000 years despite a temporary respite during the Enlightenment era). Though he is not ready yet to know the secret handshake of the Illuminati.

    • Kevin,

      I’d do almost anything if you would teach me the secret handshake!

  • Brian Westley

    Hey, if you’re OK with religious idiots throwing shit (literally) at 8-year-old girls because they aren’t “modest” enough, that says a lot about you.

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