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February 20, 2012 10:58 am

Hitler’s Lost Son with French Mistress Fought Against Germans in World War II

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It turns out that claims by Jean-Marie Loret, that he was the son of Adolph Hitler, may have been true.

In a 1981 autobiography, Loret claimed that his father was the former German dictator and mass murderer.  Historians have argued both ways on the issue, but new evidence, published by Le Point magazine in France last week and provided by a lawyer for Loret’s family, adds fuel to the fire for Loret’s claim.  He died in 1985.

The evidence includes records of Hitler supporting Loret’s mother financially and paintings found in her apartment which were signed “Adolph Hitler”.  Loret’s mother met Hitler during World War I in France, when German forces were stationed in the country.  She was 16 at the time.

In a twist of irony, Loret was a member of the French resistance movement during World War II, fighting against the forces led by his possible father.

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Le Point writes (text below translated from French):

One evening in June 1917, returning a little drunk from a night out with a friend, he [Hitler] got frisky with Charlotte. In March of the next year, a son was born. …

Years passed, and Charlotte refused to talk about the mysterious circumstances of her son’s birth. Destitute and vaguely shamed, she gave up custody of her son to another family in 1934.

His “real father” refused to see him but continued from time to seek to ask for news about him from his mother.

A few weeks before she died in the early ’50s, Charlotte confessed to her son the true identity of her father. The shock was terrible.

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