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April 18, 2012 2:23 pm

The Hypocrisy of Assange’s Interview with Hezbollah Leader

avatar by Lakkana Nanayakkara

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Julian Assange (left) and Daniel Domscheit-Berg at the 26C3 in Berlin, December 2009. Photo: wiki commons.

Julian Assange, the founder of Wikileaks, interviewed Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah, for the first episode of his new talk show. The show was broadcast on RT, a television network funded by the Russian government, notable for producing a relentless stream of anti-American bulletins. The pre-recorded program, “The World Tomorrow,” featured Nasrallah’s first interview to the media in six years, from a secret location in Lebanon and with the aid of translators.

Hezbollah is designated by the United States and the European Union as a terrorist Organization.

During the interview, Nasrallah claimed that Israel is unable to decipher Hezbollah communications because Hezbollah agents use village slang. He described Israel as an illegitimate state, denied corruption within Hezbollah and said a single state of “Palestine” should be ruled by Palestinians. Nasrallah also said he supported the Syrian regime and called for the opposition to negotiate with Bashar al-Assad.

When Nasrallah said the “resistance” would like to liberate all Lebanese land from Israel, Assange did not challenge his answer by mentioning that Israel is not occupying any Lebanese land. Assange also described Nasrallah as someone who had “fought against the hegemony of the United States”.

The Guardian newspaper in Britain described Assange as “a useful idiot” and RT as a “Kremlin propaganda channel”. This article noted the irony of Assange, described by RT as “the world’s most famous whistleblower”, working for a regime that kills and imprisons journalists, human rights activists and Vladimir Putin’s political opponents.

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