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May 4, 2012 10:32 am

Hitler Held “Messianic Complex” According to British Secret Service Paper

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Mark Abrams. Photo: SWNS.com.

Documents recently made public in a donation to the University of Cambridge show the British Secret Service believed Hitler was showing signs of a “messianic complex” and an intensifying sense of paranoia beginning in 1942.

“Hitler is caught up in a web of religious delusions,” MacCurdy wrote. “The Jews are the incarnation of evil, while he is the incarnation of the spirit of good.  He is a god by whose sacrifice victory over evil may be achieved. He does not say this in so many words, but such a system of ideas would rationalise what he does say that is otherwise obscure,” the papers read.

Months before the Nazis began to implement “the final solution” in 1942, in an attempt to exterminate European Jews from existence, papers were drawn up by Cambridge academic Joseph MacCurdy, which belonged to Mark Abrams, a member of the BBC’s overseas propaganda analysis unit during World War II.

Beginning in 1942, MacCurdy’s paper asserts that Hitler’s speeches portrayed “a man who is seriously contemplating the possibility of utter defeat”.

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“MacCurdy recognised that, faced with external failure, the Nazi leader was focusing on a perceived ‘enemy within’ instead – namely the Jews,” says Dr. Scott Anthony of the University of Cambridge.  Dr. Anthony uncovered the report drafted for the British Secret Service after looking into associates and family members of Mark Abrams.  Abrams’ family donated the paper to a collection on his life’s work at Cambridge.

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