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July 18, 2012 9:39 am

“Most Wanted Nazi” Detained in Hungary

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Laszlo Csizsik-Csatary. Photo: screenshot via ABC News.

Suspected Nazi war criminal Laszlo Csizsik-Csatary was recently found in Budapest, and after calls to arrest Csatary came from the Simon Wiesenthal Center, the man believed to have assisted in the murder of over 15,000 Jews during the Holocaust has been detained by Hungarian authorities.

While initial reports claimed that Csatary had been charged with war crimes, the 97 year old former Hungarian police officer has been placed under house arrest.  Authorities plan to question him regarding his role in the deportation of thousands of Jews from Hungary during World War II, leading to their deaths in numerous places across Europe, including Auschwitz.

Csatary was found by a reporter for the British newspaper The Sun, in Budapest recently.

“I don’t want to discuss it,” he told the reporter. “No I didn’t do it, go away from here.”

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The Simon Wiesenthal Center has provided evidence to Hungarian officials which it says proves Csatary’s role in the deaths of 15,700 Jews during World War II.  The center says Csatary is its “most wanted Nazi” in the world who has not been brought to justice.

“This new evidence strengthens the already very strong case against Csatary and reinforces our insistence that he be held accountable for his crimes,” said Efraim Zuroff of the Wiesenthal Center. “The passage of time in no way diminishes his guilt and old age should not afford protection for Holocaust perpetrators.”

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