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November 28, 2012 1:47 pm

TIME Magazine Online Poll Places Netanyahu Right After Bashar Assad for Person of the Year

avatar by Zach Pontz

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Cropped photo of Time Magazine's upcoming cover featuring Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu. Photo: Time.

With the end of the year upon us the one major question still lingering is: who will be TIME magazine’s Person of the Year?

A recent poll on the magazine’s website may offer some insight. A list of forty individuals, which included Israel’s Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu (of whom TIME wrote, “His support for the Republican challenger was lacking in the diplomatic restraint that’s customary in international politics, and it remains to be seen whether his cool relationship with the re-elected President will improve in Obama’s second term. It needs to.”), was posted to the site, with readers offered a choice of “Definitely” and “No Way.”

The results were surprising. Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi was far and away the winner of the “Definitely” category, taking 231,939 votes, at the time of publication, followed by North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un, who tallied 170,429 votes and Malala Yousafzai, a young Pakistani activist who was shot by the Taliban in October who garnered 112,323 votes. Netanyahu was near the bottom with only 11,234 votes.

Even more surprising was the group that garnered the most “No Way” votes. Again, Morsi won this category. Netanyahu took fourth place with more than 80,000 votes, coming in right after Syria’s genocidal dictator, Bashar al-Assad. He may well take solace in the fact that second place went to Sheldon Adelson, the billionaire Jewish casino magnet who spent millions on Republican candidates during this year’s election.

Of course, as is noted at the top of the poll, TIME editors ultimately make the decision as to who should be Person of the Year, so these results don’t mean a thing.

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