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December 26, 2012 11:09 am

Mubarak Lawyer: Hamas and Hezbollah Freed Morsi From Egyptian Prison

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Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi. Photo: wiki commons.

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi gained release from prison during the Egyptian revolution because of his connections to Hamas and Hezbollah according to the lawyer of Hosni Mubarak.The lawyer was being interviewed for an Egyptian broadcast that aired Sunday. Israeli daily Maariv first reported on the story Wednesday.

According to the lawyer, the testimony of Omar Suleiman, who served as the head of Egyptian intelligence until being named as Hosni Mubarak’s Vice President during the revolution that ultimately toppled his government, indicated that Morsi was arrested during the protests due to suspicions that he was inciting against the government. In a military operation, members of al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’s military wing, and activists affiliated with Hezbollah breached the prison where he was being held and he along with other senior officials were freed.

The lawyer also said Suleiman, who died under mysterious circumstances in July, claimed Hosni Mubarak¬† was not responsible for the deaths of protestors during the country’s revolution, but rather it was militants from Hamas and Hezbollah.

According to the program, on January 28 militants from Hamas and Hezbollah infiltrated the Sinai with help from local Bedouins. They then joined Muslim Brotherhood activists who were at Tahrir Square.

In the interview, Mubarak’s lawyer was asked “You mean to tell me that the Egyptian intelligence chief Omar Suleiman stood before the court and said that whoever killed the protesters were members of Hamas and Hezbollah?” to which the lawyer replied, “Yes, everything was in cooperation and under the guidance of the Muslim Brotherhood.”

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