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July 10, 2013 3:08 pm

‘Rebel’ Song Offers Hope for Egypt’s Future

avatar by Rachel Ehrenfeld

Email a copy of "‘Rebel’ Song Offers Hope for Egypt’s Future" to a friend

Protests in Egypt. Photo: Gigi Ibrahim.

With more daring Egyptians like the rappers of “The Rebel Song,” there is a glimmer of hope that Egypt may not be lost to the Islamists.

The Egyptian Rebel Song is a rap preformed by “The Arabian Knightz,” which was posted on YouTube on May 26, 2013 (view the video here). The song is in Arabic and no English translation was available. A friend of the American Center for Democracy (ACD), who is both reliable and fluent in Arabic, translated it and sent us the link.

The video has been viewed more than 100,000 times, and although there is purportedly a version entirely in English, we were unable to find it.  There are no English subtitles.

The youthful performers are undoubtedly Egyptians with some interesting sensibilities. The Muslim Brotherhood isn’t named in the song.  No need: it’s implied everywhere, and to use it would be impolitic at the moment.  Moreover, the singers perception of freedom and democracy is the same as ours, not the Islamist oxymoron of “Islamic Democracy.” And there’s no mention of Obama, Anne Patterson, the U.S., Europe, the International Monetary Fund, or even Israel and the Zionists.

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The singers hold the notion that their revolution was to end oppression and injustice, and to rescue Egypt and the Egyptian people.

Consider the lines: “I’ve decided to live as a human being, and if I have to die/Then I will die as a human being.”

And they say, “Religion is for God, but the homeland is for all/ We follow God’s law/ but we won’t let it be bought and sold.” This suggests that someone in Egypt believes that religion is a private matter, that is to say, not something that a group of mere men can have a corner on and use to oppress.

They rap against the oppression of Islamism:  “I see Egyptians being humiliated – gangs riding the nation/Trying to create a new generation of ignorance/So I’m rebelling against oppression and cries of ‘forbidden!'”

In short, the singers protest against Political Islam and the Islamist who hijacked the state’s political power to silence them: “I’m rebelling against people who’ve made it their profession/To exploit our faith for their own profit/I’m rebelling to show that I’m a human being and I have a voice and rights.”

Here is the English translation of the lyrics to “The Rebel Song”:

Forgive me – but I still believe in the revolution

I don’t much like to talk, but I’ll act if I’m provoked

It’s a simple issue, I don’t need your explanations

I have the power to change things, to revolt for change

I saw their strange ways, I didn’t understand

The same old ways as before, tell me:

Where are the rights that were taken away?

A country in the dumps, always going down

I’m here to revolt against the path of failure

Tell me where are the people who said: 100 days!

Tell me where are the people who said: 100 days!

Tell me: what has been achieved? Egyptians are still deprived

Your “renaissance” is nothing at all

I don’t have any right to declare a rebellion in your name

But I have a right to tell you what I think

To remind you of that day when we refused to run from their bullets

I’ve decided to rebel, for real, I’ve decided to rebel

And to remain an Egyptian

Some people may lose their lives, but our nation will rise

I am Egyptian, and I rebel, saying: Everything for the revolution!

In the name of the Merciful, the Compassionate

In the name of the noble Quran

In the name of Muhammad, the seal of the prophets

Religion is for God, but the homeland is for all

We follow God’s law, but we won’t let it be bought and sold

Sorry mister president, but I’ve decided to rebel

I’m going back to Tahrir Square

I have the right to say no

We’re the ones who came in the first revolution

To clean the streets of the city squares

But after those free elections, they stole our religion and our faith

My brother died there, he thought he would get me my rights

Now I look in the mirror and hate what I see

I’m silent, as if I’ve put my hands in my pockets

While my country is drowning, crying for help

My brother died a martyr

I’m not with the Brotherhood, nor of the Salafis or the liberals

I’m just an Egyptian who’s rebelling

Against oppression and injustice, wherever they are

Because I’ve decided to live as a human being, and if I have to die

Then I will die as a human being

Some people may lose their lives, but our nation will rise

I am Egyptian, and I rebel, saying: Everything for the revolution!

I’m Egyptian and I’m shouting out loud

Who’s listening? I’m a human being

When I speak on behalf of the people, fear won’t hold me back

I have a dream and no matter who tries to take my rights

I keep on dreaming of my country,

And of the revolution which will bring it back to me

I’m not afraid because I’m a free man

My country hangs in the balance, but I can see our destination clearly

I see Egyptians being humiliated – gangs riding the nation

Trying to create a new generation of ignorance

So I’m rebelling against oppression and cries of “forbidden!”

I’m rebelling against people who’ve made it their profession

To exploit our faith for their own profit

I’m rebelling to show that I’m a human being and I have a voice and rights

I’m rebelling on behalf of al-Azhar, and I’m not afraid to say “no”

Some people may lose their lives, but our nation will rise

I am Egyptian, and I rebel, saying: Everything for the revolution!

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  • Jane S. Gabin

    Brave and noble words. But I still see no females, not in the singing group, on the bus, on the streetsm or anywhere on this video. So what does that say?

    • Dear jane ..
      actually “Wara2a B-100″ is a Band from three performers .. it has nothing to do with females and males .. in Egypt alot of females started to perform with another bands .. but this band is from three members ” two of them are brothers ” 🙂

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