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September 11, 2015 4:21 pm

Survey: Only 6 Percent of American Jews ‘Very Confident’ in IAEA Ability to Police Iran Nuclear Deal

avatar by Shiryn Solny

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A satellite image of the Parchin site. Photo: AP/Institute for Science.

A satellite image of the Parchin nuclear site in Iran. The majority of American Jews are not confident in the IAEA’s ability to monitor Iran and make sure it complies with the nuclear deal. Photo: AP/Institute for Science.

The majority of American Jews lack confidence in the ability of the U.S. and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to monitor Iran’s compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) concluded in July, according to a new survey released on Friday.

The 2015 American Jewish Committee (AJC) Survey of American Jewish Opinion revealed that only 6 percent of American Jews are “very confident” in the IAEA’s capability to oversee Tehran’s implementation of the agreement. Additionally, 26 percent of respondents said they were “not at all confident,” 28 percent “not so confident,” and 38 percent were “somewhat confident.”

The survey also revealed that while 51 percent of all respondents approve of the Iran nuclear deal and 47 percent disapprove, most American Jews are not confident in the deal’s ability to curb Tehran’s nuclear activity. Only 5 percent are “very confident,” 30 percent are “not so confident,” 31 percent are “somewhat confident,” and 33 percent are “not confident at all” that the deal will prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons.

The AJC has commissioned surveys of American Jewry for many years now on a range of key issues. On the topic of security for Israel, 18 percent of respondents in the 2015 survey said they believe Israel’s safety will be “less threatened” by the Iran deal while 43 percent are convinced that it will be “more threatened,” and 38 percent say it will “stay the same.”

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