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November 13, 2015 7:09 am

Israeli Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Home Demolitions for Terrorists, ‘Within Reason’

avatar by David Daoud

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The Israeli Supreme Court ruled against a petition to prevent the houses of terrorists from being demolished. Photo: Wikipedia.

The Israeli Supreme Court ruled against a petition to prevent the houses of terrorists from being demolished. Photo: Wikipedia.

Israel’s Supreme Court issued a ruling on Thursday saying it was permissible to destroy the houses of the terrorists who murdered Dani Ganon, Malachi Rosenfeld, and Naamah and Eitam Henkin, Israeli daily nrg reported.

The court’s decision rejected the petition by the families of the terrorists, who claimed that home demolitions are ineffective in combating terrorism.

According to the decision, delivered by Chief Justice Miriam Naor, and judges Chanan Meltzer and Noam Solberg, the state is authorized to carry out demolitions on the basis of security assessments, “within reasonable bounds and with discretion.”

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The court’s opinion revealed that the state had presented confidential material regarding the deterrent effect of house demolitions on terrorism which showed “many cases where potential terrorists were forced to refrain from carrying out attacks due to the fear of the repercussions against their families’ homes.”

The decision came in the wake of sharp criticism directed at the court by right-wing MKs, arguing that it prevented the state from effectively combating terrorism.

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