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December 28, 2015 7:16 pm

Al Jazeera Details Gaza Terror Groups’ Stockpiles of Home-Made Rockets, Missiles (VIDEO)

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Al Jazeera's list of Gaza-made projectiles. Photo:Screenshot

Al Jazeera’s list of Gaza-made projectiles. Photo:Screenshot

Al Jazeera published details this week of the rocket and missile arsenals belonging to Hamas and other terrorist groups in the Gaza Strip.

An infographic posted on the Qatari news organization’s website lists Gaza’s domestically manufactured arsenal, only including models fired by Palestinian groups since 2001 — roughly a year after the start of the Second Intifada.

It also features a graphic of a map of Israel, along with the approximate range of each missile and rocket, illustrating that virtually the entire Jewish state is within the scope of Gaza’s missile capabilities — as far north as Haifa.

The longest-range rocket is the R-160, which apparently has a reach of 150-160 kilometers and carries a 175-kilogram payload. During Operation Protective Edge, Hamas claimed on the website of its armed wing, the Izzadin Al-Qassam Brigade, to have fired nine of these rockets, according to the Times of Israel. Al Jazeera says it was made in honor of Abdel Aziz al-Rantisi, a co-founder of Hamas killed by the IDF in 2004.

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Another rocket, the J-80, was used by the Izzadin Al-Qassam Brigade during Operation Protective Edge, and has a range of 80 kilometers. The J-80 was apparently named after Ahmed Jabari, the reported second-in-command of Hamas’ military wing, who was liquidated by Israel during Operation Pillar of Defense in 2012.

And there is the M-75, the Gaza-produced Iranian Fajr-5 used to fire at Tel Aviv, among other places. It has a 75-kilometer range and carries a 70-kilogram warhead.

The Israel Air Force responded to two rocket attacks from the Gaza Strip about two weeks ago by attacking Hamas targets, though the rockets were apparently fired by a smaller ISIS-affiliated terrorist outfit called the Omar Hadid Brigades, rather than Hamas, which has apparently ceased all rocket fire since the 2014 truce ended Operation Protective Edge. Israel nevertheless holds Hamas accountable for all rocket fire emanating from Gaza.

Israel severely minimized the threat from Palestinian rockets and missiles through the Iron Dome missile defense system, which was deployed outside all of Israel’s major population centers within rocket range during the 2014 war. Thousands of rockets were fired, but only seven civilians died during Operation Protective Edge.

IDF Spokesman Lt. Col. Peter Lerner posted the infographic on his Facebook page on Monday, along with the following comment:

Today Al Jazeera published this infographic exposing the vastness of the rocket stockpiles that the different “resistance” groups in Gaza have amassed. AlJazeera didn’t leave much for the imagination showing the range of the different rockets while marking the various Israeli towns (aka targets). One question comes to mind. Why, after three campaigns, and thousands of rockets fired at Israel, are the terrorist groups still investing in these terrorist tools? Israel has proven time and time again that we will meet the challenge and develop technologies that negate their terroristic intentions. Wouldn’t it be better if they built schools for studying, hospitals for healing and factories for innovating? I would love to hear your views on this.

Below is an Al-Quds Brigade video of the Baraq-70, a rocket also on the list apparently used mostly by Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which has a 70-kilometer range and a 90-kilogram payload:

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