Friday, October 20th | 30 Tishri 5778

Close

Be in the know!

Get our exclusive daily news briefing.

Subscribe
June 29, 2016 12:33 pm

Muslim, Christian, Jewish Leaders Plan Interfaith Worship Center in Jerusalem

avatar by JNS.org

Email a copy of "Muslim, Christian, Jewish Leaders Plan Interfaith Worship Center in Jerusalem" to a friend
A view of Jerusalem. Muslim, Christian, and Jewish leaders are planning to open an interfaith place of worship in Jerusalem. Photo: Wikipedia.

A view of Jerusalem. Muslim, Christian, and Jewish leaders are planning to open an interfaith place of worship in Jerusalem. Photo: Wikipedia.

JNS.org – Muslim, Christian, and Jewish leaders are planning to open an interfaith place of worship in Jerusalem for one week in September, The Media Line reported.

From Sept. 5-11, a Jerusalem structure currently known as the Alpert Youth Music Center will become “AMEN,” a place of worship for the three Abrahamic faiths sharing “a passion for Jerusalem in which they will co-exist temporarily under the wings of the Almighty.”

The worship center is being created as part of the annual Mekudeshet (“Blessed”) festival, which is part of Jerusalem’s Season of Culture initiative.

Tamar Elad-Appelbaum, the religious leader and founder of the Zion synagogue community in Jerusalem, said that this type of joint worship “is very natural for an entire sector of the public. You pray together. It goes back to the most ancient ways people here in this city prayed, and prayed communally, so communicated. Today we live in categories that, frankly, we could do without.”

Related coverage

September 16, 2016 2:04 am
1

Were God Merely to ‘Exist,’ Our Prayers Would Be Meaningless

“God is a circle whose center is everywhere and circumference nowhere,” said Voltaire. Indeed, trying to describe God is like trying to...

Sheikh Ihab Balha of the Islamic College in Baqa al-Gharbiyye, who represents the Sufi Muslim community in Jaffa, said that “our reality is that in the State of Israel and with the Palestinians we live in a reality of war and with media that harm people left and right and maximize cleavages and estrangement, and we have leaders that maintain this attitude — it’s clear as light. So we intend creating something religious and true against the lie that everything is a lie and only war exists.”

“We people of faith believe that the distance of politicians and leaders from the world of religious life and we have come to see that it is specifically religion that can bring peace, not contentious negotiations,” he added.

Share this Story: Share On Facebook Share On Twitter Email This Article

Let your voice be heard!

Join the Algemeiner
  • Esther Noodelman

    There should be a sign at the door to this ecumenical gathering:

    Make sure you’ve left your guns and knives at home !

    I hope the place has enough guards to protect all the worshippers!

    Better still,why not let the Jews pray at Har Habayit while the other 2 faiths pray below so that we are sure our people,the People of the Book are not exposed to the usual violence..you know,a TRIAL RUN to prove the other faiths act as we do !!!!!

  • Jay Lavine

    I agree completely that we live in categories, labels that we put on people, that we could do without, as Elad-Appelbaum suggests. Labels tend to create divisiveness, or, in Balha’s words, “cleavages and estrangement.” Therefore, the idea is a great one.

    Beyond praying together, however, I would hope for discussion of philosophical ideas. I am reminded of the time of Rambam, AKA ibn Maimon, who engaged in exchanges of this nature and who even wrote some of his treatises in Arabic, most notably, دلالة الحائرين, better known to English speakers as The Guide for the Perplexed and to Hebrew speakers as, in transliteration, Moreh Nevuchim. This is the kind of thing that breeds mutual respect and, in line with the Jewish concept that we can learn from everyone, benefits us all.

    I pray this kind of undertaking will lead to bigger and better things and, ultimately, to improved understanding, harmony, and shalom.

  • Mario D.

    Strange; they never wanted to do that when they ruled the Jews. They had one rule: abuse Jews and keep them out.

Algemeiner.com